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Framework for development of data analysis protocols for groundwater quality monitoring systems

Date

1992

Authors

Adkins, Nadine C., author
Ward, Robert C., advisor
Loftis, Jim C., committee member
Iyer, Hariharan, committee member
Bell, Harry F., committee member

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Abstract

Protocols for field sampling and laboratory sampling are used on a routine basis to produce accurate and precise water quality data. Efforts are now being focused on providing decision makers with the information they need from that data. Statistics is one method of extracting information from data. There are no widely accepted protocols for statistically analyzing groundwater quality data. Due to the wide variety of field conditions encountered in groundwater monitoring, a general protocol would be of limited use. What is needed is a set of guidelines for writing site specific data analysis protocols. A framework for developing data analysis protocols (DAPs) is presented in this thesis. The framework is essentially a "how-to" manual for protocol writers. It is designed to be concise, easy to use, and based on the current state-of-the-art. The focus of the framework is the analysis of groundwater quality data at hazardous waste facilities. Detailed background information is presented for the framework. The four main issues that are addressed include: information goals, data record attributes, and choice and interpretation of statistical results. There is a great deal of confusion in the water quality community regarding these issues. This thesis does not attempt to resolve that confusion. Instead, the goal was to sort out the areas of conflict and uncertainty, and present them in a clear manner. Recommendations are provided where possible. The framework was used to write a data analysis protocol for an IBM semiconductor manufacturing plant in Hopewell Junction, New York. The combination of flexibility in the basic framework and the availability of detailed background information was quite effective. It allowed the data analysis protocol to be site specific and scientifically defensible.

Description

1992 Fall.
Includes bibliographic references (pages 193-208).

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Subject

Water quality monitoring stations
Groundwater -- Quality -- Analysis

Citation

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