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dc.contributor.advisorClevenger, Caroline
dc.contributor.advisorNobe, Mary
dc.contributor.authorReaves, Daniel
dc.contributor.committeememberAloise-Young, Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:23:25Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:23:25Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.description2014 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractEnergy consumption in the residential sector can be significantly influenced by human behavior. However, only limited behavior change research exists that is aimed at reducing energy consumption in the affordable housing sector. This study seeks to implement the first two phases of the Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) framework in an affordable housing setting. The goals of the research are to identify optimal behaviors for energy reduction and to identify perceived barriers and benefits associated with those behaviors, using an affordable housing facility in Loveland, Colorado as the case study. Five target behaviors and their leading barriers and benefits are established. By implementing this framework, this study also identifies potential issues and nuances in the CBSM process that researchers should take into consideration during future implementations of CBSM in affordable housing environments.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierReaves_colostate_0053N_12773.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/88591
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.titleIdentifying perceived barriers and benefits to reducing energy consumption in an affordable housing complex using the Community-Based Social Marketing model
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineConstruction Management
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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