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dc.contributor.advisorDavalos, Deana
dc.contributor.authorDarwin, Marielle L.
dc.contributor.committeememberPrince, Mark
dc.contributor.committeememberMalcolm, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-22T11:00:21Z
dc.date.available2021-11-22T11:00:21Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2020 Spring
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractProblematic alcohol use is a pattern of hazardous consumption that commonly leads to negative outcomes that affect college students' ability to complete day-to-day responsibilities. Behavioral strategies such as ensuring a safe ride home or avoiding drinking games is linked to a reduction of alcohol-related consequences by providing concrete tactics to enable a change in patterns of consumption. Thus, improving an individual’s ability to utilize these strategies before or during alcohol consumption is targeted in contemporary interventions and preventative approaches. In spite of this practice, much is unknown regarding the underlying cognitive facilities needed to: retain awareness of these strategies, choose approaches in accordance with the situation at hand and update these tactics as needed. If the ability to productively utilize these methods is dependent on cognitive abilities, then individuals with poor cognitive function may be at a disadvantage. The aim of the current study was to investigate the roles of executive cognitive functioning and metacognition as they relate to behavioral strategy usage and adverse alcohol-related outcomes. Results indicate that executive cognitive functioning is inversely related to the number of experienced alcohol-related consequences. Furthermore, low executive function and metacognitive beliefs about alcohol pertaining to the cognitive harm of drinking interacted to significantly affect the use of behavioral strategies, which in turn was inversely related to consequences. The findings of the current study offered a cognitive-based model in support of the practice of employing strategies to decrease alcohol-related consequences, and determined whether implementation of these tactics can successfully take place in those with poor cognitive and metacognitive function.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierDarwin_colostate_0053N_15900.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/234036
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2020- CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright and other restrictions may apply. User is responsible for compliance with all applicable laws. For information about copyright law, please see https://libguides.colostate.edu/copyright.
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectcollege students
dc.subjectmetacognitive beliefs
dc.subjectprotective behavioral strategies
dc.subjectexecutive cognitive function
dc.subjectalcohol-related consequences
dc.subjectproblematic alcohol use
dc.titleDecreasing problematic alcohol use with behavioral strategies: a cognitive model
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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