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dc.contributor.advisorHolling, Michelle A.
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Joseph P.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T21:05:49Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T21:05:49Z
dc.date.submitted2006
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/192935
dc.description2006 Fall
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (p. 112-141)
dc.description.abstractDomestic violence is a cultural epidemic in U.S. society. How we define, perceive, and treat domestic violence is a product of the material rhetorics about it. Since film is a prominent mode of rhetorical discourse, I examine how the issue of domestic violence is represented in the 2002 film Enough. I argue that the film presents a view of domestic violence that offers space for empowerment, but serves to potentially place real women in danger. I undertake a dual-methodological approach using a textual analysis of the film and a focus group discussion with female domestic violence professionals/providers to discern the negative material effects of Enough. In my concluding section, drawing from feedback from the focus group participants, I offer suggestions for improving portrayals of domestic violence that may lead to ending this problem.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subject.lcshViolence in motion pictures
dc.subject.lcshAbused wives
dc.titleDangerous message : the material effects of Enough, A
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.committeememberBubar, Roe W.
dc.contributor.committeememberDickinson, Greg
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech Communication
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University


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