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dc.contributor.advisorDurnford, Deanna S.
dc.contributor.advisorSanford, William E.
dc.contributor.authorWatt, Jamey T.
dc.contributor.committeememberStednick, John D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T16:08:12Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T16:08:12Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.descriptionDepartment Head: Frank G. Ethridge.
dc.description2003 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 92-96) and appendices.
dc.description.abstractFlow augmentation projects utilizing managed groundwater recharge serve as a management tool for the conjunctive use of groundwater and surface water. The projects emphasize providing adequate water quantity at the right place and at the right time. However, water quality must be addressed. Mixing of different qualities within such a system can affect water quality both in the river and in the alluvial aquifer. The Tamarack Ranch Groundwater Recharge Project (Project) operates adjacent to the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. The Project re-times excess flows in the South Platte River using managed groundwater recharge. Surface water, groundwater, and extraction water samples from the site were analyzed for water quality parameters and ionic composition. Water chemistry from the different sample locations determined the spatial and temporal influence of managed recharge activities. Two primary and distinct source waters are present in the system – groundwater and river water. The groundwater is dominated by calcium and bicarbonate. The river water is dominated by sodium / calcium and sulfate. The extraction water is a mixture of these two sources. The application of a simple batch mixing technique determined that the extraction water was about 80% groundwater. This research found that a streamflow augmentation project using managed groundwater recharge does affect water quality. As the system continues to operate, alluvial aquifer water quality will be affected by the surface water quality. A space for time substitution shows how groundwater quality is changing due to the effects of additional river water entering the alluvial aquifer system.
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierETDwjt100001.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2003100001FRWS
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/1838
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relationwwdl
dc.relationCatalog record number (MMS ID): 991019549599703361
dc.relationGB1225.C6.W377 2003
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectwater quality
dc.subjectstreamflow augmentation project
dc.subjectTamarack Ranch Groundwater Recharge Project
dc.subjectLower South Platte River
dc.subjectColorado
dc.subject.lcshStreamflow -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshWater quality management -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshSouth Platte River (Colo. and Neb.) -- Regulation
dc.titleWater quality changes at a streamflow augmentation project, Lower South Platte River, Colorado
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineForest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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