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dc.contributor.artistPeeler, Rochelle
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-09T15:27:48Z
dc.date.available2016-08-09T15:27:48Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.description2016 Spring.
dc.descriptionColorado State University Art and Art History Department capstone project.
dc.descriptionCapstone contains the artist's statement, a list of works, and images of works.
dc.description.abstractThe artist's statement: "Alice laughed, "There's no use in trying,' she said: 'one can't believe impossible things.' - 'I daresay you haven't had much practice,' said the Queen." Through the Looking Glass, Carroll, Lewis - To be as curious as Alice yet be assertive as the Queen, making art isn't an impossible thing especially when it comes to printmaking. My art reflects my love for storytelling and making up characters. I love finding ways to create narratives and made frozen windows to worlds; some known like "Alice in Wonderland" or "Through the Looking Glass" and others from my imagination. When I create art I found myself engulfed in the process, like in a trace or self-meditation, and just keep adding more and more: from layers of ink from the studio to the globs of hot glue, I find myself pushing boundaries and try to make the piece as different as I could make it. In the end of this process I have made two different series, the "Self-Monster Portraits" and the "Wonderland Series". The "Wonderland Series", I turned an innocent story into a dark one by rearranging parts of the original story. It was my way to have fun while making art and create a world that suggests criminal activity from our beloved Alice. Think of it as a dark comic with the canvas as the panels. As for the "Self-Monster Portraits" is about one person and how she sees herself; throughout the series we see her change form and become different characters to suit the environments needs, like a personality switch. Though in real life, which is represented with real objects, she appears normal and has distracting features to draw away from her faults that marks her skin, to the sides of her reflects her insecurities and "ugliness". As her environment changes, so does her armor... making her a different person each time.
dc.format.mediumStudent works
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/176305
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofPrintmaking
dc.rightsCopyright and other restrictions may apply. User is responsible for compliance with all applicable laws. For information about copyright law, please see https://libguides.colostate.edu/copyright.
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectprintmaking
dc.titleRochelle Peeler: capstone
dc.title.alternativeNarrative, The
dc.typeStillImage
dcterms.rights.dplaThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/). You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).
thesis.degree.disciplineArt and Art History
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduate
thesis.degree.nameCapstone


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