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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorLuong, Gloria
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-18T18:05:25Z
dc.date.available2016-04-18T18:05:25Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.description.abstractInterpersonal stressors, such as arguments and disagreements, are among the most distressing types of daily experiences. It is therefore important to understand how people cope with such stressors. Previous studies suggest that older adults are more likely to use emotion-focused, avoidant, and passive coping strategies during interpersonal tensions (e.g., Birditt & Fingerman, 2003), which are among the most effective strategies for these types of stressors (e.g., Blanchard-Fields et al., 2007). Individuals with greater depressive symptoms also tend to use similar coping strategies and yet, they often exhibit lower efficacy (Coyne, Aldwin, & Lazarus, 1981). The current study investigates how age correlates with depressive symptoms and coping styles in response to a controlled negative interpersonal stressor. Younger adult (18-35 years old) and older adult (60+ years old) participants (N = 159) discussed hypothetical dilemmas with an age-group, gender, and cultural group matched confederate who was scripted to act unfriendly and disagreeable. As expected, individuals with greater depressive symptoms were less likely to engage in active coping and more likely to self-blame, use behavioral disengagement, and be in denial about the negative social interaction with the confederate. Moreover, there was an interaction effect such that with increasing depressive symptoms, older adults were less likely to vent (i.e., express negative affect) with the confederate whereas for younger adults, greater depressive symptoms was associated with greater venting. However, it was also found that depressive symptoms were more likely to be found in the young adult participants than the older adult participants. These findings suggest the importance of considering how the association between depressive symptoms and coping strategies may depend on age and other possible motivational factors.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumStudent works
dc.format.mediumposters
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/171953
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2016 Projects - Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity (CURC) Showcase
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectcoping strategies
dc.subjectolder adults
dc.subjectyounger adults
dc.subjectinterpersonal stressor
dc.subjectinteraction
dc.titleCoping with a negative social interaction: the role of age and depressive symptoms
dc.typeImage
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Development and Family Studies


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