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dc.contributor.advisorPasricha, Sudeep
dc.contributor.authorZou, Yong
dc.contributor.committeememberRoy, Sourajeet
dc.contributor.committeememberChen, Tom
dc.contributor.committeememberBohm, Wim
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-27T03:56:50Z
dc.date.available2015-08-27T03:56:50Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.description2015 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractWith CMOS technology aggressively scaling into the ultra-deep sub-micron (UDSM) regime and application complexity growing rapidly in recent years, processors today are being driven to integrate multiple cores on a chip. Such chip multiprocessor (CMP) architectures offer unprecedented levels of computing performance for highly parallel emerging applications in the era of digital convergence. However, a major challenge facing the designers of these emerging multicore architectures is the increased likelihood of failure due to the rise in transient, permanent, and intermittent faults caused by a variety of factors that are becoming more and more prevalent with technology scaling. On-chip interconnect architectures are particularly susceptible to faults that can corrupt transmitted data or prevent it from reaching its destination. Reliability concerns in UDSM nodes have in part contributed to the shift from traditional bus-based communication fabrics to network-on-chip (NoC) architectures that provide better scalability, performance, and utilization than buses. In this thesis, to overcome potential faults in NoCs, my research began by exploring fault-tolerant routing algorithms. Under the constraint of deadlock freedom, we make use of the inherent redundancy in NoCs due to multiple paths between packet sources and sinks and propose different fault-tolerant routing schemes to achieve much better fault tolerance capabilities than possible with traditional routing schemes. The proposed schemes also use replication opportunistically to optimize the balance between energy overhead and arrival rate. As 3D integrated circuit (3D-IC) technology with wafer-to-wafer bonding has been recently proposed as a promising candidate for future CMPs, we also propose a fault-tolerant routing scheme for 3D NoCs which outperforms the existing popular routing schemes in terms of energy consumption, performance and reliability. To quantify reliability and provide different levels of intelligent protection, for the first time, we propose the network vulnerability factor (NVF) metric to characterize the vulnerability of NoC components to faults. NVF determines the probabilities that faults in NoC components manifest as errors in the final program output of the CMP system. With NVF aware partial protection for NoC components, almost 50% energy cost can be saved compared to the traditional approach of comprehensively protecting all NoC components. Lastly, we focus on the problem of fault-tolerant NoC design, that involves many NP-hard sub-problems such as core mapping, fault-tolerant routing, and fault-tolerant router configuration. We propose a novel design-time (RESYN) and a hybrid design and runtime (HEFT) synthesis framework to trade-off energy consumption and reliability in the NoC fabric at the system level for CMPs. Together, our research in fault-tolerant NoC routing, reliability modeling, and reliability aware NoC synthesis substantially enhances NoC reliability and energy-efficiency beyond what is possible with traditional approaches and state-of-the-art strategies from prior work.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierZou_colostate_0053A_12824.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/166872
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectnetwork-on-chip
dc.subjectrouting
dc.subjectmodeling
dc.subjectsynthesis
dc.subjectreliability
dc.titleReliability-aware and energy-efficient system level design for networks-on-chip
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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