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dc.contributor.authorWiens, John A.
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Aaron L.
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Department of Soil and Crop Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Department of Biology
dc.contributor.institutionCalifornia State University, Fullerton
dc.contributor.institutionUnited States. Agricultural Research Service
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Northern Colorado
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:03:18Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T07:03:18Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.descriptionThe SGS-LTER research site was established in 1980 by researchers at Colorado State University as part of a network of long-term research sites within the US LTER Network, supported by the National Science Foundation. Scientists within the Natural Resource Ecology Lab, Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, and Biology Department at CSU, California State Fullerton, USDA Agricultural Research Service, University of Northern Colorado, and the University of Wyoming, among others, have contributed to our understanding of the structure and functions of the shortgrass steppe and other diverse ecosystems across the network while maintaining a common mission and sharing expertise, data and infrastructure.
dc.description.abstractThe issue of scale is important in ecology. Many studies have indicated that ecological patterns can vary with the grain and extent of the study, and thus it is difficult to extrapolate from fine to coarse scales. Furthermore, habitats are generally not homogenous, so interactions between an organism and its environment, as well as the scale at which they are examined, are primary factors underlying the patterns or processes being studied. This study has many facets, but we are particularly interested in how spatial patterns of beetle species richness and environmental variables change with scale. Other questions address whether there are spatial scales where correlations between beetle abundance and environmental measures peak? Identifying such scales should provide insights to the processes responsible for the observed patterns.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumpresentations (communicative events)
dc.format.mediumposters
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/85115
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.publisher.originalSGS-LTER, Colorado State University
dc.relation.ispartofPresentations - Shortgrass Steppe-Long Term Ecological Research (SGS-LTER)
dc.subjectshortgrass steppe
dc.subjectlong term ecological research
dc.subjectgrassland ecology
dc.subjectPawnee National Grassland
dc.subjectCentral Plains Experimental Range
dc.titleMulti-scale assessment of beetle diversity and landscape properties, A
dc.typeText


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