Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLauenroth, William K.
dc.contributor.authorBetz, Dani-Ella
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Department of Soil and Crop Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University. Department of Biology
dc.contributor.institutionCalifornia State University, Fullerton
dc.contributor.institutionUnited States. Agricultural Research Service
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Northern Colorado
dc.coverage.spatialPawnee National Grassland (Colo.)
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:03:16Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T07:03:16Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.descriptionThe SGS-LTER research site was established in 1980 by researchers at Colorado State University as part of a network of long-term research sites within the US LTER Network, supported by the National Science Foundation. Scientists within the Natural Resource Ecology Lab, Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, and Biology Department at CSU, California State Fullerton, USDA Agricultural Research Service, University of Northern Colorado, and the University of Wyoming, among others, have contributed to our understanding of the structure and functions of the shortgrass steppe and other diverse ecosystems across the network while maintaining a common mission and sharing expertise, data and infrastructure.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the distribution of plant species in the shortgrass steppe to determine if the roadsides were acting as corridors, increasing the susceptibility of the open steppe to exotic species establishment. We surveyed 45 paired roadside and open steppe sites and found few exotic species in the the open steppe (.36/m2), whereas the roadsides contained significantly more (5.42/m2). We examined the soil seed bank along a transect from roadsides to 25 meters into the open steppe to investigate the range of seed dispersal and abundance of roadside exotic seeds. We found that a significantly greater number of exotic seeds in the roadsides (873 seeds per m2) versus the open steppe (109 seeds per m2). To investigate the dynamics of exotic species establishment we planted two exotic species, downy brome (Bromus tectorum) and Dalmation toadflax (Linaria dalmatica), into the open steppe. A matrix of 5 treatments was applied and after one field season Bromus tectorum germinated and established in many plots. The nitrogen and nitrogen plus water treatments were the most successful in promoting the growth of Bromus. Linaria dalmatica did not establish in any of the research plots. The open steppe has few exotic species and we found that few exotic seeds exist in the seed bank. Furthermore, our work indicates that even if exotic species seeds were numerous, they may have difficulty germinating and establishing in the native communities.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumpresentations (communicative events)
dc.format.mediumposters
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/85108
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.publisher.originalSGS-LTER, Colorado State University
dc.relation.ispartofPresentations - Shortgrass Steppe-Long Term Ecological Research (SGS-LTER)
dc.subjectlong term ecological research
dc.subjectgrassland ecology
dc.subjectshortgrass steppe
dc.subjectCentral Plains Experimental Range
dc.subjectPawnee National Grassland
dc.titleDynamics of exotic species and their establishment in the Pawnee National Grasslands
dc.typeText


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record