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dc.contributor.advisorWoerner, Dale R.
dc.contributor.advisorBelk, Keith E.
dc.contributor.authorPerham, Carlie Claire
dc.contributor.committeememberEngle, Terry E.
dc.contributor.committeememberDelmore, Robert J.
dc.contributor.committeememberFoster, Michelle T.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:42:45Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:42:45Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.description2014 Summer.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractNutritional qualities of consumer foods are of great importance in improving health. The American obesity epidemic and resulting government recommendations for the decrease in the consumption of foods with high fat and sodium content resulted in an increase in consumer awareness of nutrition. In 2010, the Food Safety Inspection Service published the final rule "Nutrition Labeling of Single-Ingredient Products and Ground or Chopped Meat and Poultry Products" (75 FR 82148) requiring nutrient facts for individual retail cuts be labeled, effective January 1, 2012, under revisions to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for "Nutrition labeling of meat and meat food products" (9 CFR 317.300). Veal products are included in the section regarding the "Identification of major cuts of meat products", which specifies cuts required to have a nutrition label, including veal (9 CFR 317.344). In order to supply veal producers and retailers with nutritional label information, and therefore provide consumers with accurate nutritional information, it is necessary to analyze modern and prevalent veal retail cuts for nutrient content. Ten raw and cooked special-fed veal cuts from six different suppliers of United States-sourced veal were analyzed for nutrient contents. Veal has improved in many aspects of nutrient composition compared to values used in the current United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agriculture Research Service (ARS) Nutrient Database Standard Reference 26 (SR-26). According to USDA federal regulations (9 CFR 317.362), leg cutlets, loin chops, and shank cross-cuts (osso buco) can be labeled under the USDA classification of "Extra Lean" with less than 5g total fat, 2.5g or less of saturated fat, and less than 95mg of cholesterol. Additionally, shoulder blade chops were considered "Lean", having less than 10g fat, less than 5 g of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol per 100 g. The American Heart Association "Heart Check" requirements are met by leg cutlets, loin chops, and shank cross-cuts. Compared to SR-26 data, cholesterol levels declined by 30%. Veal provides an "excellent" source of: Vitamins B2, B3, B6, B12; selenium, zinc, phosphorus, and copper. Additionally, veal is a "good" source of Vitamin D, iron, and potassium. These results provide nutrition facts for consumers to use in conjunction with common cookery methods like grilling- which currently is not an option for veal when searching for foods on the current SR. Additionally, values for choline and Vitamin D are now available for veal. Vitamin D levels in veal from these data showed that raw and cooked ground veal fulfill the requirements to be labeled as a "good source" of this anti-carcinogenic nutrient, containing more Vitamin D than fortified milk and having close to the same levels of eggs and fish. Veal is a lean, complete protein choice for consumers, providing "excellent" and "good" amounts of protein, vitamins, and minerals.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierPerham_colostate_0053N_12632.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/84133
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectcomposition
dc.subjectfatty acid
dc.subjectmeat
dc.subjectnutrient
dc.subjectspecial-fed
dc.subjectveal
dc.titleSpecial-fed veal: separable components, proximate composition, and nutrient analysis of selected raw and cooked, wholesale and retail cuts
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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