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dc.contributor.advisorHughes, Harrison
dc.contributor.authorAbdul Sadeg, Salem
dc.contributor.committeememberVolk, Gayle
dc.contributor.committeememberBrick, Mark
dc.contributor.committeememberHolm, David
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:40:58Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:40:58Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.description2014 Spring.
dc.description.abstractOlive (Olea europaea L.) consumption and production are important socially and economically in Libya. Olive cultivars that are adapted to local conditions produce olives that have high quality and quantities of oil. Many of the important olive cultivars grown in Libya were evaluated in this research. One goal of this project was to determine the plasticity of morphological traits of olive cultivars that have been grown at diverse locations within Libya. A second goal was to identify a set of traits that are independent of each other and show limited variation (stable traits) regardless of the environmental conditions. The stable traits were then used in subsequent analyses to correlate genetic and phenotypic characteristics of Libyan olives. Two different groups of olives were compared: the 45 landraces and the 45 cultivars of Olea europaea subsp europaea var. sativa. Morphological data were collected for a total of 39 morphological traits (22 quantitative and 17 qualitative), which were then combined and analyzed to determine phenotypic diversity among different locations. Differences in many of the morphological traits were observed across the cultivars. These sets of data were used to identify unique and desirable Libyan landraces morphologically. Stable phenotypic traits were used to discriminate between use of fruit (oil or dual-purpose) as well as cultivar origins (local or introduced). This research demonstrates that local Libyan cultivars (landraces) have unique characteristics that differentiate them from imported cultivars. Ten microsatellite markers were used to differentiate and evaluate the relationships among a total of 91 olive genotypes (39 landraces, 36 introduced cultivars and 16 wild types) collected in Libya. A total of 109 alleles were identified using 10 loci, with the number of alleles per locus ranging from 4 to 20. Three loci (UDO43, DCA16 and GAPU101) had the most alleles with 20, 18 and 16, respectively. The wild types and introduced cultivars had greater numbers of alleles than the local cultivars. Six cases of duplicated genotypes, two cases of synonymy, and thirteen homonyms that were genetically distinct were observed in the Libyan collection. UPGMA clustering classified the accessions into two main distinct groups. The first group consisted of landraces and the second group included introduced cultivars and wild type accessions. Admixture analysis also distinguished between landraces and wild genotypes. In general, molecular data enables one to separate the Libyan olive accessions based on their orgin but not on their fruit use.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierAbdulSadeg_colostate_0053A_12358.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/82589
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectolive tree
dc.subjectmorphological traits
dc.subjectSSR
dc.subjectmicrosatellite markers
dc.subjectmolecular traits
dc.titleMorphological and molecular characterization of Libyan olive, Olea europaea l., cultivars (42 local and 16 wild type) in comparison to 41 introduced (world) cultivars
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineHorticulture and Landscape Architecture
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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