Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorNewman, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLawhon, James B.
dc.contributor.committeememberVagias, Wade
dc.contributor.committeememberPayne, Sarah
dc.contributor.committeememberBruyere, Brett
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:11:28Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:11:28Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.description2013 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractResource degradation resulting from visitor behavior continues to be a significant concern for land managers, and effective educational messages such as those promoted through Leave No Trace, which target depreciative behaviors, are imperative. This thesis examined psychological and knowledge variables that were hypothesized to influence Leave No Trace behavioral intent of visitors to national and state parks. While knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of outdoor enthusiasts in the context of Leave No Trace have been studied in backcountry visitors, research pertaining to frontcountry visitors is limited. Chapter 1 examined specific factors that influence Leave No Trace behavioral intent in visitors to Rocky Mountain National Park. Data were obtained from an on-site survey administered to individuals (N = 390, response rate 74%) in the Bear Lake corridor of the park. Results of a regression analysis revealed that perceived effectiveness of Leave No Trace practices is a significant predictor of future behavioral intent (B > .21, p < .001, in all cases). Frontcountry visitors like those at Bear Lake are more likely to practice Leave No Trace if they perceive the practices to be effective at reducing impacts. Chapter 2 examined variables that were hypothesized to influence Leave No Trace behavioral intent in state park visitors. Data were obtained from an on-site survey administered to individuals (N = 346, response rate 93%) in three Wyoming state parks and historic sites. Results suggest that both attitudes and the perceived effectiveness of Leave No Trace practices are meaningful predictors of behavioral intent in state park visitors, and that messaging targeting these variables can be effective at influencing behavioral intent. Both chapters in this thesis provide specific managerial implications that could strengthen Leave No Trace educational efforts in frontcountry locations by targeting specific attitudes and perceptions about recommended Leave No Trace practices in order to influence behavioral intentions. Furthermore, the results indicate that visitors to national parks and state parks could generally benefit from a more uniform approach to Leave No Trace education, which is likely to enhance overall adoption of Leave No Trace by land managers across the agency spectrum.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierLawhon_colostate_0053N_12068.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2013500390HDNR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/81034
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectLeave No Trace
dc.subjectimpact
dc.subjectoutdoor ethics
dc.subjectenvironmental education
dc.subjectfrontcountry
dc.titleInfluencing Leave No Trace behavioral intentions in frontcountry visitors to national and state parks
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Dimensions of Natural Resources
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record