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dc.contributor.advisorBodine, Jay
dc.contributor.authorDore, Fernanda
dc.contributor.committeememberKirby, Rachel
dc.contributor.committeememberMoseman, Eleanor
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T08:33:52Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T08:33:52Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.description2012 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.descriptionText in German ; title and abstract in English and German.
dc.description.abstractGraffiti, Post-Graffiti, Urban Art and Street Art are sometimes used as synonyms. Authors in the field of Street Art agree that this art form derives directly from the subway graffiti in New York, and often designate it as an art movement. This work defends the thesis that the more the art on the Berlin Wall increased the tolerance towards and integration of the art in the public spaces, the more it contributed to the popularization of the contemporary Street Art in Berlin. The goal of this paper is trifold: 1. to clarify the relationship between the Street Art in Berlin today and the art on the Berlin Wall; 2. to understand the institutionalization of this art form; and 3. to bring light to the democratization of art through Street Art in Berlin. With this purpose, I will analyze the efforts that differentiate Berlin from other cities and position Street Art not as vandalism, but rather as a part of the art in public spaces. The essence of this art form derives from site-specific art, whereby the place plays an inherent part in the artwork. These qualities can be recognized in the Street Art in Berlin from the 70's until today, and its popularization is deeply connected with the German cultural politics of the 70's and the historical significance of the Wall Art. In addition, Street Art challenges the paradigms between high and low art, as well as the contemporary role of the museum. The consequences of the institutionalization of this art form are its democratization and commodification. Finally, Street Art can be considered responsible for a Musealization from Below, whereby the place (the walls of the metropolis) becomes part of the work and its cultural, historical and identity values are emphasized. This is particularly true in the case of the Berlin Wall. Street Art is site-specific, because the works give the place a new meaning and vice-versa. Instead of simulating Street Art in an institutional space, the projects in Berlin attempt to transform the street into an art gallery, inserting the art into the life of the people and finally contributing to the democratization of art.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierDore_colostate_0053N_11558.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2012400419FLAL
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/73557
dc.languageGerman
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectBerlin
dc.subjectBerliner Mauer
dc.subjectgraffiti
dc.subjectidentität
dc.subjectMauerkunst
dc.subjectstreet art
dc.titleStreet art und die demokratisierung der Kunst in Berlin
dc.title.alternativeStreet art and the democratization of art in Berlin
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineForeign Languages and Literatures
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


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