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dc.contributor.advisorSavidge, Julie A.
dc.contributor.advisorDouglas, Michael E.
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Jennifer
dc.contributor.committeememberDouglas, Marlis R.
dc.contributor.committeememberRichards, Christopher
dc.contributor.committeememberGivens, Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T08:06:06Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T08:06:06Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.description2012 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractHistorically, behavioral and ecological research on snakes has been limited due to the secretive and cryptic nature of these species. Readily available molecular techniques have enhanced the study of reproductive behavior and advanced our understanding of mating patterns (such as multiple paternity) that were previously deemed ambiguous. Instead they have been revealed as often prevailing and strongly influential on genetic population structure. Underlying biological questions about the social and behavioral movements associated with mating can be addressed by correlating the results of population genetic analyses with known social structure and can be used to make inferences regarding landscape genetics and gene flow. During a three-year (2001--2003) ecological study of a geographically isolated population of Northern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) in Meriden, Connecticut, U.S.A., blood samples from 254 individuals (117 adults and 137 juveniles) were collected for extraction and amplification of genomic DNA. Five microsatellite DNA markers, derived from species closely related to the study organism, were used to identify individuals in the population and to infer paternity. These analyses revealed aspects of mate selection, reproductive ecology, and sociality in Northern Copperhead. No spatial genetic structure among dens could be determined with the available data and thus influence of den structure on mating patterns could not be inferred. In contrast, genetic structure in the form of three distinct genetic clusters was identified within the population. Paternity tests identified a nonrandom mating pattern by which individuals showed a clear pattern of intra-cluster mating. Causation underlying this phenomenon remains unclear, as further ecological and genetic data would be needed.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierKendall_colostate_0053N_11086.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2012500056ECOL
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/65326
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectparentage assignment
dc.subjectmating behavior
dc.subject.lcshAgkistrodon contortrix
dc.titleInferring mating behavior and reproductive success of (Agkistrodon contortrix) using molecular parentage assignment tests
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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