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dc.contributor.authorKellogg, Jessica M.
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:04:59Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T07:04:59Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.description.abstractPast research has demonstrated differences in visual processing between the dominant, or preferred eye, and the non-dominant, or less preferred eye. Researchers have accounted for these differences according to either physiological mechanisms (Porac & Coren, 1976) or behavioral preferences (Mapp, Ono, & Barbeito, 2003). The behavioral preferences account can be eliminated by examining how the eyes process visual illusions which are not expected to be influenced by prior experiences. One particular illusion, the Fechner-Benham Color Illusion, involves disks featuring black and white designs which, when rotated, produce the illusion of various subjective colors within the disks (Rosenblum, Anderson, & Purple, 1981). It was hypothesized that when viewing the Fechner-Benham Illusion with the nondominant eye, participants would exhibit longer latencies for the onset of color andwould report fewer colors compared to viewing with the dominant eye and with binocular vision. The underlying physiological mechanisms that are often regarded in subjective color perception are either described high in the visual information hierarchy, in a neurophysiological site, thus eliminating the retinal level (Rhollec & Vi�not, 1999;Robinson, 1896). Or, antagonistically, they are described as taking place within theretina in terms of an uneven distribution of photoreceptor cells (Jarvis, 1977).
dc.description.awardCollege Honors.
dc.format.mediumStudent works
dc.format.mediumposters
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/566
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2005 Projects - Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity (CURC) Showcase
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subject.lcshVisual perception
dc.subject.lcshColor vision
dc.titleOcular dominance and subjective color perception: a study using the Fechner-Benham Visual Illusion
dc.typeStillImage
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Sciences


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