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dc.contributor.advisorRosecrance, John C.
dc.contributor.authorDartt, Angela L.
dc.contributor.committeememberChen, Peter Y.
dc.contributor.committeememberDouphrate, David I.
dc.contributor.committeememberBrazile, William Joseph
dc.contributor.committeememberGilkey, David P.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T04:41:38Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T04:41:38Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.descriptionDepartment Head: Jac A. Nickoloff.
dc.description2010 Summer.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractPoor characterization of exposures due to inadequately tested ergonomics exposure assessment tools contributes to the skepticism regarding the work-relatedness of musculoskeletal disorders. Due to their ability to capture individual exposures for large populations, observational methods have been commonly used to assess awkward postures in occupational settings. However, use of observation-based methods is complicated due to infrequent assessment of reliability and validity. While direct instrumentation is typically recommended for assessment of awkward postures, application of direct instrumentation in large field studies has been limited. Evaluation of reliability, validity, and sampling strategies are critical for ergonomic exposure assessment tools, particularly for research that attempts to establish a causal relationship between ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal outcomes. The results of this dissertation research addressed rater reliability, method reliability, and sampling strategy concerns for a computer-based observation tool and direct measurement devices known as an inclinometer. In general, the results from this dissertation research indicated: observation of postures using a video-based assessment tool demonstrated moderate to high inter- and intra-rater reliability for the majority of anatomical areas and body parts evaluated; comparison of a video-based posture assessment tool and inclinometry demonstrated moderate to high correlation for the majority of anatomical areas and body parts evaluated; and, evaluation of sampling strategies of posture assessment using inclinometry demonstrated that two to four hours of sampling may be sufficient when assessing postures of the upper arms and trunk. This dissertation research provided critical information regarding the need for improved exposure assessment techniques in the field of ergonomics.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierDartt_colostate_0053A_10078.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2010100004ERHS
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/40283
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectergonomics
dc.subjectvalidity
dc.subjectreliability
dc.subjectposture
dc.subject.lcshHuman engineering
dc.subject.lcshHealth risk assessment
dc.subject.lcshPosture -- Measurement
dc.subject.lcshMusculoskeletal system -- Wounds and injuries
dc.titleErgonomic exposure assessment: a study of rater reliability, method reliability, and sampling strategy
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental and Radiological Health Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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