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dc.contributor.authorRolston, Holmes, 1932-
dc.coverage.spatialColorado
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:59:15Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:59:15Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 207).
dc.description.abstractWilderness valued as mere resource for human-interest satisfaction is challenged in favor of wilderness as a productive source, in which humans have roots, but which also yields wild neighbors and aliens with intrinsic value. Wild value is storied achievement in an evolutionary ecosystem, with instrumental and intrinsic, organismic and systemic values intermeshed. Survival value is reconsidered in this light. Changing cultural appreciations of values in wilderness can transform and relativize our judgments about appropriate conduct there. A final valued element in wildness is its idiographic historical particularity, and most surprising is the emergence of a novel morality when humans learn to let values go wild.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumarticles
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationRolston, Holmes, III, Values Gone Wild, Inquiry 26, no. 2 (June 1983): 181-207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/36764
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.publisher.originalTaylor and Francis
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Ethics: Anthologies and Journal Articles - Rolston (Holmes) Collection
dc.rights©1983 Taylor and Francis
dc.subjectecosystems
dc.subjectsurvival value
dc.subjectwild value
dc.subjectwilderness
dc.subjectenvironmental values
dc.titleValues gone wild
dc.typeText


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