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dc.contributor.advisorManning, Dale
dc.contributor.advisorSeidl, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorMulungu, Kelvin
dc.contributor.committeememberCostanigro, Marco
dc.contributor.committeememberBellows, Laura
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-11T11:21:12Z
dc.date.available2021-01-11T11:21:12Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.description2020 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractClimate-related shocks, such as droughts and floods, can have particularly harmful effects for poor rural households in developing countries. In this dissertation, I determine how forests affect a household's ability to cope with shocks, estimate how agricultural input use changes after shocks, and explore a novel explanation for high rates of undernutrition within food-producing households. In the first essay, using data from Malawi, I find that households allocate labor away from agriculture to forests in the event of a weather shock and that access to forests offsets the negative effect of weather shocks on nutrition and food security. In the second essay, I use nationally representative data on smallholder households in Zambia and find that, after a weather shock, households are less likely to use a risky input and more likely to use a less risky input because they become more risk-averse. Access to credit can mitigate the negative impact of a shock on the likelihood of using fertilizer. In the last essay, I use household production and demographic data from a household survey that I conducted in Zambia to measure nutrition deficits created by insufficient food production or food sales that, if consumed at home, would have contributed to household nutrition. I find that nutrient deficits, from either insufficient production or selling output, are detrimental to nutrition and food security. High lean season food prices reduce the quantity of market-bought foods demanded and undermine the ability of households to use income from crop sales to purchase food. In summary, rural households respond to shocks in various ways. Both natural resource access and improved credit markets can offset the negative impacts from a shock while increasing food production and nutrition outcomes.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierMulungu_colostate_0053A_16388.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/219637
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2020- CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectnatural insurance
dc.subjectrisk aversion
dc.subjectweather shocks
dc.subjectnutrition
dc.subjectforests
dc.subjecttechnology adoption
dc.titleThree essays on weather shocks, nutrition and forests
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Resource Economics
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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