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dc.contributor.advisorNorton, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHogeboom, Alison
dc.contributor.committeememberBjostad, Louis
dc.contributor.committeememberUchanski, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-14T17:06:50Z
dc.date.available2019-06-14T17:06:50Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.description2019 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractAdequate nutrition is essential for European honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony growth, and productivity, yet foraging limitations resulting from factors such as habitat loss often lead to dietary deficiencies. Plant secondary metabolites are key constituents of floral nectar that support physiological processes in honey bees, however, these compounds are only available to bees with access to a diversity of floral resources. Furthermore, the relationship between different classes of plant secondary metabolites and their function within honey bee diets requires further investigation. Using a structure-function framework, we evaluated whether four structurally similar plant secondary metabolites found in the nectar of common agricultural crops elicit comparable effects on honey bee survival and pathogen tolerance. The addition of plant secondary metabolites to artificial nectar solution enhanced median survival, in some cases more than doubling the lifespan of worker honey bees. Moreover, plant secondary metabolites demonstrated nutraceutical effects, and sometimes elicited medicinal effects on honey bees infected with Nosema ceranae. Our findings provide a platform to identify plant secondary metabolites which can augment current management techniques to support the long-term sustainability of the apiculture industry.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierHogeboom_colostate_0053N_15447.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/195399
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjecthoney bee
dc.subjectplant secondary metabolites
dc.subjectnosema ceranae
dc.subjectchemical ecology
dc.titlePlant secondary metabolites enhance survival and pathogen tolerance in the European honey bee: a structure-function study
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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