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dc.contributor.advisorLuong, Gloria
dc.contributor.authorArredondo, Carla Michelle
dc.contributor.committeememberCoatsworth, J. Douglas
dc.contributor.committeememberBorrayo, Evelinn A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-14T17:05:12Z
dc.date.available2019-06-14T17:05:12Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.description2019 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractDespite all that is known about racial differences in health and well-being outcomes, much less is known about the processes that give rise to these differences. Previous work examining racial differences in stress-health processes has primarily focused on examining stressor exposure as a predictor and posits that mediating effects account for the racial differences in health and well-being outcomes. This study expands on previous work by examining the extent to which different stressor characteristics (i.e., stressor exposure and affect reactivity) may account for racial group differences in the following health and well-being outcomes: grip strength, health conditions, self-rated health, depressive symptoms, loneliness, and life satisfaction, and by testing for both mediating and moderating effects of each stressor characteristic. Results demonstrate that there were racial differences in self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and loneliness. In all instances, Whites demonstrated more favorable outcomes compared to non-Whites. These racial differences, however, were not accounted for by mediating effects of either stressor characteristic. Furthermore, the results indicate that race moderated the association between the stressor characteristics and grip strength, loneliness, and life satisfaction. Results are discussed in light of a stress-health framework and implications for minority health and well-being are discussed.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierArredondo_colostate_0053N_15129.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/195239
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjecthealth and well-being
dc.subjectminority health
dc.subjecthealth differences
dc.subjectaffect reactivity
dc.titleUnderstanding racial health differences: the role of stressor exposure and affect reactivity
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Development and Family Studies
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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