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dc.contributor.authorBruno, Jasmine
dc.contributor.authorFernandez-Gimenez, Maria
dc.contributor.authorJamsranjav, Chantsallkham
dc.contributor.authorJablonski, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorDosamantes, Elena
dc.contributor.authorWilmer, Hailey
dc.coverage.spatialNorth America (The United States of America, Canada, Mexico)
dc.coverage.temporal2017-09-2018-08
dc.date2019
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-11T21:41:22Z
dc.date.available2019-06-11T21:41:22Z
dc.descriptionThe dataset contains information of journal articles that meet the following criteria: 1) a geographic focus on North America, 2) a social science component, 3) focus on rangeland or ranching systems, and 4) a scientific article published in a peer-reviewed journal from 1970 to 2017 in English or Spanish. The data are analyzed and published in a systematic map to characterize this literature by 1) the research objectives and questions, 2) who was studied, 3) where research was conducted, 4) which theories, methodologies, and methods were applied, and 5) how these research characteristics have changed from 1970 to 2017.
dc.description.abstractRangeland scientists have made substantial progress in understanding ecological dynamics of rangelands, but the social factors have received less attention in North America. A body of North American rangeland social science has developed over the past four decades, with the number of studies increasing each decade. However, these works have not been systematically reviewed to assess the state of rangeland social science in North America and to identify research gaps. We developed a systematic map to characterize this literature by 1) the research objectives and questions, 2) who was studied, 3) where research was conducted, 4) which theories, methodologies, and methods were applied, and 5) how these research characteristics have changed from 1970 to 2017. We found that most (81%) North American rangeland social science has studied ranchers, farmers, and/or landowners, with limited consideration of other stakeholders (e.g., ranch workers, youth). Although age (43% of the studies) and education (40%) are often considered, other demographic attributes and identities, such as gender (28%) and race or ethnicity (18%), are less frequently included. The most commonly used research method is surveys (52%) and much of rangeland social science does not make explicit connections to either specific methodological or theoretical frameworks. The limited application of theories, methodologies, and a diversity of methods has potentially constrained who and what has been studied in North America. The lack of consideration of gender and race in rangeland social science is echoed in the limited number of studies that have accounted for the effects of social identities and power relationships on people’s connection to and management of rangelands. This review highlights the need for more North American research that 1) is informed by social theory, 2) applies a diversity of methods, 3) considers a broader diversity of stakeholders, and 4) draws from multiple social science disciplinary traditions.
dc.description.sponsorshipColorado Agricultural Experiment Station COL00769
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/195227
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25675/10217/195227
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofData - Colorado State University
dc.relation.isreferencedbyBruno, J.B., Jamsranjav, C., Jablonski, J.E., Dosamantes, E.D., Wilmer, H., Fernández-Giménez, M.E. 2019. The landscape of North American rangeland social science: a systematic map. Rangeland Ecology & Management 73, 181-193. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rama.2019.10.005
dc.subjectbibliometrics
dc.subjectgap map
dc.subjectinterdisciplinary
dc.subjectsocial difference
dc.subjectsystematic review
dc.titleDataset associated with "The landscape of North American rangeland social science: a systematic map"
dc.typeDataset


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