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dc.contributor.advisorOpsal, Tara
dc.contributor.authorSatterfield, Leslie
dc.contributor.committeememberLacy, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberMartinez, Doreen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-07T17:19:05Z
dc.date.available2019-01-07T17:19:05Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.description2018 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractHuman Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, and has different prevalence rates among different gender, racial, ethnic, and class groups. Many studies have identified number of sex partners as the most predictive variable for HPV status which implies individual behavior is responsible for differences in HPV rates between social groups. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the extent to which individual and structural factors correlate with HPV status, and whether those correlations vary by race. This study uses public-use data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from years 2011-2014. Logistic regression models which included individual risk behaviors, structural resources, and interactions with black and white race showed that number of sex partners has a different effect on HPV risk for black and white women. These findings suggest that citing number of sex partners as the primary predictor of HPV risk may falsely universalize whiteness, and pathologize black sexuality.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierSatterfield_colostate_0053N_15112.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/193092
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.titleIndividual and structural predictors of Human Papillomavirus: race as an interaction effect and the construction of racialized sexualities
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineSociology
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


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