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dc.contributor.advisorShomaker, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Morgan
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T20:04:29Z
dc.date.available2020-09-06T20:05:05Z
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifierBurke_colostate_0053N_14906.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/191321
dc.description2018 Summer
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThere is a cross-sectional and prospective association of depressive/anxiety symptoms with excess weight in adolescents. Theoretically, intervening to decrease mental health symptoms in adolescents at-risk for excess weight gain may offer a novel approach to also decrease the risk for excess weight gain. Mindfulness-based approaches show preliminary promise in adults with obesity and in some adolescent samples; yet feasibility and acceptability in adolescents at-risk for excess weight gain has not been determined. In this study, I examined the feasibility and acceptability of a 6-week mindfulness-based group program in adolescent girls and boys at-risk for excess weight gain, and I explored the effects of participation in a mindfulness-program on perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and body mass index (BMI) indices, as compared to a 6-week health education control group program. Participants were age 12-17 years old and determined to be at-risk for excess weight gain based upon above-average BMI percentile or a strong family history of overweight. Adolescents were assessed at baseline, 6-weeks/post-treatment, and a 6-month follow-up. Fifty-four adolescents were randomized to the mindfulness group program (n=29) or the health education control group (n=25). In the mindfulness group, participants were on average 13.97 years old, 66% non-Hispanic White, and 90% had overweight or obesity (BMI >=85th percentile). In the health education control group, participants were on average 14.49 years old, 72% non-Hispanic White and 84% had overweight or obesity. Feasibility and acceptability were measured by group attendance, homework completion, and program acceptability ratings. Depression, anxiety symptoms, and perceived stress were measured by validated surveys. Adolescents' median session attendance was six out of six sessions in both the health education group and the mindfulness group. In the mindfulness group, homework completion averaged 63%. In the mindfulness group, 92% thought that the group addressed their concerns, and 100% would recommend the group to others like them. Adolescents randomized to the mindfulness group showed greater decreases in perceived stress at post-treatment than adolescents in the health education group. There were some within-condition changes in key variables, but no other significant between-condition effects at either post-treatment or 6-months follow-up were observed. In conclusion, a relatively brief mindfulness-based group program appears to be feasible and acceptable to adolescents at-risk for excess weight gain. A mindfulness-based training program may offer some acute psychological benefits, particularly in terms of perceived stress. Yet, further research is needed on mindfulness programs for adolescents at-risk for excess weight gain with longer follow-up periods, and also with adolescents with elevated depression and anxiety at baseline.
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2017- CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectanxiety
dc.subjectdepression
dc.subjectMindfulness
dc.subjectBMI
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectexcess weight gain
dc.titlePilot study of a mindfulness-based group program in adolescents at risk for excess weight gain, A
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.accessEmbargo Expires: 09/06/2020
dcterms.embargo.terms2020-09-06
dcterms.embargo.expires2020-09-06
dc.contributor.committeememberLucas-Thompson, Rachel
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Sarah
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Development and Family Studies
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.


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