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dc.contributor.advisorBright, Alan
dc.contributor.authorDeGroot, Samantha L.
dc.contributor.committeememberBernasek, Alexandra
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Kelly
dc.contributor.committeememberShwiff, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-12T16:13:58Z
dc.date.available2018-06-12T16:13:58Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.description2018 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThe population increase and spread of feral swine across the United States is of increasing concern to producers, land managers, the common public, and government. Feral swine carry harmful diseases, cause extensive damage to property, and are opportunistic omnivores that will eat anything. This study explores how mass media coverage and aspects of the cognitive hierarchy influence the specific lethal management action of a toxicant usage to control feral swine. A content media analysis was conducted to observe how the media portrays the toxicant Kaput across different time periods and news platforms. Statistical analysis revealed that a little over half of the articles were published following four major events which included, a) approval of 'Kaput' as a state-limited-use pesticide in Texas b) restraining order against the use of 'Kaput' c) the passing of a bill requiring strict scientific study of any further toxicant before release in Texas, and d) the withdrawal of 'Kaput' in the state of Texas. An additional analysis revealed the most discussed themes within the articles including a) the use of a toxicant as a management tool to control feral swine b) the mention of the toxicant containing a Warfarin base, and c) challenges regarding the toxicant as being species-specific. The majority of these articles were either negative or neutral, mostly describing the toxicant and then explaining the faults in its use. This resulted in the toxicant being pulled off of the market. In addition to the content media analysis, a wildlife survey was mailed out to 200 urban residents and 200 rural residents from each of the 50 United States to measure individuals' wildlife value orientations, general beliefs toward feral swine, and their support or opposition of the use of poison to kill feral swine. The overall response rate was 11%. Statistical analysis revealed that negative attitudes toward feral swine and a domination wildlife value orientation were key identifiers of support for a toxicant lethal management action of feral swine (p < .05). The opposite was determined with a non-significant value for a mutualism value orientation, opposing the use of a toxicant. As wildlife managers and government agencies continue efforts to mitigate damages and manage feral swine, the value orientations and attitudes of the public should be taken into consideration. The lethal management action chosen should reflect the public's value orientations and attitudes to have an accepted management technique suitable to control feral swine as well as support the public.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierDeGroot_colostate_0053N_14701.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/189324
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectKaput
dc.subjectwild pig
dc.subjecttoxicant
dc.subjectferal swine
dc.titleFactors predicting acceptability of toxicant usage to control feral swine
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Dimensions of Natural Resources
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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