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dc.contributor.authorLalande, Bradley
dc.contributor.authorAbdo, Zaid
dc.contributor.authorHanna, John
dc.contributor.authorPage-Dumroese, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorWarwell, Marcus
dc.contributor.authorTirocker, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorKim, Mee-Sook
dc.contributor.authorKlopfenstein, Ned B.
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-14T14:15:10Z
dc.date.available2017-11-14T14:15:10Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.description.abstractArmillaria root disease causes extensive damage to tree roots throughout the world and lacks successful management practices. Soil metagenomics and metatransciptomics may unlock the ability to understand how soil microbial communities interact with root pathogens, which may inhibit or facilitate the pathogenicity of disease. A western white pine (Pinus monticola) seed provenance plantation located within the Priest River Experimental Forest in northern Idaho provides the ability to sample numerous Armiilaria species along with bulk density soil cores. The basis of the research is to identify how soil microbial communities differ between different Armillaria species. Sixty-three trees were chosen with preference to trees that were previously identified to be infected with either A. solidipes or A. altimontana, and split between healthy and dead trees. At each tree, we sampled DBH, tree health, bulk density soil cores, and sampled for rhizomorphs. Soil samples are used to extract DNA and RNA to identify microbial communities involved with Armillaria species. Each DNA sample was amplified at the ITS-2 and 16S rDNA region to determine what microbes were present at each tree. Rhizomorphs were isolated and amplified using the translation elongation factor-1α locus to identify Armillaria species present within sampled trees. The ITS-2 and 16S microbial communities will be analyzed to show how they differ between each Armillaria species, tree health status, seed provenance, and soil properties. If microbial communities differ between species and tree health, this may unlock a new means of management for root diseases in a forest setting.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumStudent works
dc.format.mediumposters
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/184938
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2017 Projects - Graduate Student Showcase
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectmetagenomics
dc.subjectsoil
dc.subject.lcshArmillaria
dc.titleMetagenomic approaches to determine soil microbial communities associated with Armillaria root disease
dc.title.alternative160 - Bradley M. Lalande
dc.typeText
dc.typeImage
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.


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