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dc.contributor.advisorSava, Paul C.
dc.contributor.authorDiaz Pantin, Esteban Fernando
dc.contributor.committeememberLi, Yaoguo
dc.contributor.committeememberTenorio, Luis
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:33:17Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:33:17Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.description2014 Fall.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 59-62).
dc.description.abstractReverse time migration (RTM) backscattered events are produced by the cross-correlation between waves reflected from sharp interfaces (e.g. the top of salt bodies). Commonly, these events are seen as a drawback for the RTM method because they obstruct the image of the geologic structure. Many strategies have been developed to filter out the artifacts from the conventional image. However, these events contain information that can be used to analyze kinematic synchronization between source and receiver wavefields reconstructed in the subsurface. Numeric and theoretical analysis indicate the sensitivity of the backscattered energy to velocity accuracy: an accurate velocity model maximizes the backscattered artifacts. The analysis of RTM extended images can be used as a quality control tool and as input to velocity analysis designed to constrain salt models and sediment velocity. The analysis in this thesis suggest that we can use backscattering events along with reflection data to define a joint optimization problem for velocity model building. The gradient required for model optimization suffers from cross-talk, similar to the more conventional RTM images. In order to avoid the cross-talk, I use a directional filter based on Poynting vectors which preserves the components of the wavefield traveling in the same direction. Using backscattered waves for constraining the velocity in the sediment section requires defining the top of salt in advance, which implies a dynamic workflow for model building in salt environments where both sediment velocity and salt interface change iteratively during inversion.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierT 7567
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11124/484
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2014 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjecttomography
dc.subjectsalt
dc.subjectRTM
dc.subjectbackscattering
dc.subject.lcshBackscattering
dc.subject.lcshWaves
dc.subject.lcshKinematics
dc.subject.lcshTomography
dc.subject.lcshInversion (Geophysics)
dc.titleUnderstanding the reverse time migration backscattering: noise or signal?
dc.typeText
thesis.degree.disciplineGeophysics
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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