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dc.contributor.advisorSnieder, Roel, 1958-
dc.contributor.authorPrunty, Aaron C.
dc.contributor.committeememberTSvankin, I. D.
dc.contributor.committeememberBozdag, Ebru
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, P. A.
dc.contributor.committeememberEberhart, Mark E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-03T11:28:54Z
dc.date.available2020-02-03T11:28:54Z
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2019 Fall
dc.description.abstractTarget-oriented imaging seeks to localize inhomogeneities within a medium from measurements of the waves that scatter off them. Conventionally, this requires both knowledge and control of the sources used to illuminate the scattering targets. In this thesis, I explore and develop methods for imaging arbitrarily complex acoustic scatterers that require neither knowledge nor control of the sources of illumination. Inspired by random-illumination imaging experiments in optics, I first provide a geometrical explanation of the memory effect, a phenomenon in which the interference of scattered waves from a random medium preserves information carried by the wave incident to the medium. I simulate the time dependence of the memory effect using short-duration impulses that transmit through a collection of random point scatterers. Next, I demonstrate the ability to image strongly scattering targets in the presence of unknown and uncontrolled random sources. The linear sampling method is used to invert the total recorded waveforms and obtain an image of the targets. Successful imaging under such conditions requires the persistent radiation of scattered energy that can be amplified and detected in the recorded data. Subsequently, I introduce an imaging method based on inverting the Lippmann-Schwinger equation of acoustic scattering theory. I compare the proposed Lippmann-Schwinger inversion with the linear sampling method and explore their physical bases. Numerical experiments are performed to quantitatively assess the two methods. Finally, I resolve the dependence of the linear sampling method on an ambiguous time parameter and establish a physical framework for the method's interpretation. Numerical algorithms are given to properly and efficiently implement the method in both the time and frequency domains. I validate the algorithms and interpretation of the method with numerical examples.
dc.identifierPrunty_mines_0052E_11865.pdf
dc.identifierT 8859
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/174001
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectLinear sampling method
dc.subjectMultiple scattering
dc.subjectTarget-oriented imaging
dc.subjectLippmann-Schwinger inversion
dc.subjectInverse scattering
dc.subjectRandom sources
dc.titleTarget-oriented imaging of acoustic media using unknown and uncontrolled random sources
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineGeophysics
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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