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dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Corby G.
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yicheng
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Patrick R.
dc.contributor.committeememberSpiller, D. Erik
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T18:12:13Z
dc.date.available2016-02-23T18:12:13Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.description2016 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color).
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractFroth flotation as a fundamental method for processing complex minerals is commonly applied to the surface chemistry and beneficiation of rare-earth-bearing minerals. This is due to the fact that it is possible to process a wide range of fine particle sizes and the process can be tailored to the unique mineralogy of a given deposit. Flotation effectiveness is primarily controlled by the surface-chemical properties of the minerals and related adsorption phenomena at the liquid–solid interface. This research program was designed to investigate the principles of surface chemistry and froth flotation of xenotime and selected gangue minerals. This led to a better understanding of the factors affecting flotation performance and separation of xenotime from associated gangue minerals in an efficient way. This investigation includes MLA analysis, surface area measurement, zeta potential tests, and adsorption tests of xenotime, ilmenite, zircon, schorl, and staurolite under conditions of various reagent additions and different temperatures. Octano-hydroxamic acid, sodium oleate, sodium silicates, and ammonium lignosulfonate were used in microflotation behavior evaluation. Efforts were made to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, concentration, addition order, and depressants in the microflotation of minerals with anionic collectors such as octano-hydroxamic acid and sodium oleate. Other factors, such as bubble surface tension and bubble particle size, are also discussed based on the literature review and lab observations.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierT 7996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11124/170057
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2016 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectcollector
dc.subjectdepressant
dc.subjectfroth flotation
dc.subjectmicroflotation
dc.subjectrare earth
dc.subjectxenotime
dc.titleFroth flotation of xenotime
dc.typeText
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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