Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSingha, Kamini
dc.contributor.authorBethune, James C.
dc.contributor.committeememberRunkel, Robert L.
dc.contributor.committeememberNavarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:03:45Z
dc.date.available2015-03-01T04:18:44Z
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.description2014 Fall
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color), maps (some color)
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractTime-lapse electrical resistivity (ER) is used in this study to capture the annual pulse of acid mine drainage (AMD) contamination, the so-called 'first-flush' driven by spring snowmelt, through the subsurface of a wetland downgradient of the abandoned Pennsylvania Mine workings in Central Colorado. Data were collected from mid-July to late October of 2013, with an additional dataset collected in June of 2014. ER provides a distributed measurement of changes in subsurface electrical properties at high spatial resolution. Inversion of the data shows the development through time of multiple resistive anomalies in the subsurface, which corroborating data suggest are driven by changes in total dissolved solids (TDS) localized in preferential flow pathways. Because of the non-uniqueness inherent to deterministic inversion, the exact geometry and magnitude of the anomalies is unknown, but sensitivity analyses on synthetic data taken to mimic the site suggest that the anomalies would need to be at least several meters in diameter to be adequately resolved by the inversions. Preferential flow path existence would have a critical impact on the extent of attenuation mechanisms at the site, and their further characterization could be used to parameterize reactive transport models in developing quantitative predictions of remediation strategies.
dc.identifierT 7609
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11124/10624
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.rights.access6-month embargo
dc.subjectAcid mine drainage
dc.subjectPeru Creek
dc.subjectFlow path
dc.subjectElectrical resistivity
dc.subject.lcshAcid mine drainage -- Environmental aspects -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshWetlands -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshWater quality -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Pollution -- Measurement
dc.subject.lcshPeru Creek (Colo.)
dc.titleNon-invasive flow path characterization in a mining-impacted wetland
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.embargo.expires2015-03-01
thesis.degree.disciplineGeology and Geological Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record