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dc.contributor.advisorSamuelson, Kristin
dc.contributor.authorPowers, Tyler
dc.contributor.committeememberBenight, Charles
dc.contributor.committeememberLac, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-17T10:00:46Z
dc.date.available2020-08-17T10:00:46Z
dc.date.submitted2020-08
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThe recent legalization of marijuana in many states across the nation has led to an increase in access to marijuana recreationally and as a prescription medication for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (Bonn-Miller et al., 2014). Marijuana use has shown both positive and negative effects on PTSD symptomatology (Greer et al., 2014; Wilkinson et al., 2015). Separately, PTSD and marijuana use are associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning (e.g., Johnsen & Asbjornsen, 2006; Solowij et al., 2002). However, the combined effect of both on neuropsychological functioning is largely unexplored. The present study aimed to better understand the relations among marijuana use, PTSD symptom severity, and neuropsychological functioning in a trauma-exposed sample. Participants were assessed for DMS-5 PTSD Criterion A trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, marijuana use, and neuropsychological test performance four domains (working memory, attention, inhibition, and verbal learning). Data was analyzed using path analysis, with PTSD symptom severity, marijuana use total, and the interaction between the two predicting the neuropsychological variables. PTSD symptom severity and marijuana use total were hypothesized to negatively relate to each measure of neuropsychological functioning, and marijuana use total was predicted to moderate the relations between PTSD symptom severity and the outcomes. In the final model, while controlling for one another, PTSD symptom severity was related to poorer verbal learning and inhibitory control, whereas marijuana use was related to poorer sustained attention and better working memory. These findings indicate that there may not be an additive effect of cooccurring marijuana use and PTSD symptoms on neuropsychological functioning and can be used as psychoeducation on the possible implications of marijuana use for individuals with PTSD symptoms. Future studies should incorporate thorough assessment of other substance use.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierPowers_uccs_0892N_10570.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/167623
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.relation.ispartofTheses
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectClinical Psychology
dc.titleNeuropsychological Functioning Among Individuals with Marijuana Use and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms
dc.typeText
dcterms.cdm.subcollectionPsychology
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


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