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dc.contributor.advisorQualls, Sara H.
dc.contributor.authorPlys, Evan
dc.contributor.committeememberFeliciano, Leilani
dc.contributor.committeememberSegal, Daniel
dc.contributor.committeememberLac, Andrew
dc.contributor.committeememberKluge, Mary Ann
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-02T16:49:41Z
dc.date.available2018-05-02T16:49:41Z
dc.date.submitted2018-08
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractProgrammed activity attendance is an important, yet understudied topic in assisted living (AL) research. The purpose of this study is to test four predictive models of programmed activity attendance in AL based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB; i.e., TPB, TPB with health as additional predictors of activity attendance, TPB with health as background factors, and TPB with internalized ageism as background factors). The current sample included 202 residents of 21 ALs. Participants ages ranged from 51 to 100 (M = 83.03, SD =10.27), and the majority were female (71%), White (90%), widowed (59%), and used private payment (70%). Participants completed self-report measures of physical and mental health, internalized ageism, TPB variables, and activity attendance in the past week. Structural equation modeling revealed that the TPB model evidenced acceptable fit for the data (χ2/DF = 1.95; CFI = .94; TLI = .93; RMSEA = .07), explaining 79% of the variance in behavioral intention and 43% of the variance in activity attendance. Heath variables did not explain additional variance in activity attendance beyond TPB, but did predict perceived behavioral control when tested as a background factor, explaining 32% of the variance in this construct. In addition, mental health significantly predicted affective attitudes toward activity attendance. Lastly, emotional expectations regarding aging, a proxy for internalized ageism, significantly predicted each TPB variable, explaining 9-35% of the variance in these constructs. Results from the current study suggest that TPB offers a suitable predictive framework for programmed activity attendance in AL, and attendance is under a high degree of volitional control. Results also suggest that psychological factors (e.g., mental health and internalized ageism) influence programmed activity attendance indirectly through TPB variables, and physical health may have only a minor role in explaining activity behaviors. Taken together, these findings suggest that programmed activity attendance in AL may be best explained as a social cognitive process, influenced by person-centered psychological variables. Implications for theory, future research, and practice are discussed.
dc.identifierPlys_uccs_0892D_10352.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/166918
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectactivity programming
dc.subjectinternalized ageism
dc.subjecttheory of planned behavior
dc.subjectassisted living
dc.subjectactivity
dc.subjectrecreation/leisure
dc.titleProgrammed Activity Attendance in Assisted Living: A Study of the Theory of Planned Behavior
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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