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dc.contributor.authorGrandin, Temple
dc.dateundated
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-08T20:42:47Z
dc.date.available2018-08-08T20:42:47Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/190209
dc.descriptionPaper presented at a discussion on whether or not animals should be property, with Marc Hauser, Dept. of Psychology, Harvard University, 2002.
dc.descriptionObservations made on several hundred farms, ranches, feedlots, and slaughter plants indicate that the single most important factor which affects animal welfare is the attitude of management. Places that have good animal welfare have a manager who cares about welfare. Places where animal welfare is poor often have a manager who does not care. A good manager enforces standards to maintain good welfare. Employees are well trained and people who abuse animals are punished. Dr. Temple Grandin has observed that the most effective manager is involved enough in day to day operations to care but he or she is not so involved that they become numb and desensitized to animal suffering. People who handle hundreds of animals each day can become desensitized. They need a strong manager to serve as their conscience.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the original author.
dc.subjectanimal rights
dc.subjectanimal welfare
dc.titleAnimals are not things : a view on animal welfare based on neurological complexity
dc.typeManuscript


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