The Miner’s Delight Interpretive Plan was prepared for the Bureau of Land Management by the University of Wyoming American Studies Program. Miner’s Delight is part of the Sweetwater Mining District and was the site of several phases of mining activity. Miner’s cabins and other structures dot the site today. This document examines the history of the Miner’s Delight site and makes specific recommendations for its interpretation.

This collection consists of one file: The Miner’s Delight Interpretive Plan. Included in the document is information on the history, access, and interpretation of the Miner’s Delight site west of Lander, Wyoming. This file was scanned from a hardcopy of the document.

The Miner’s Delight site is located in the South Pass area and is part of the Sweetwater Gold Mining District. This area was once the seasonal home to Native American tribes and miners searching for gold. Miner’s Delight was established in 1867 and today consists of a significant number of original, unaltered structures from that time. The majority of these buildings are constructed from logs and unfinished lumber and include log cabins, a saloon, a meat house, a shop or barn, a stamp mill, and several others. This was the site of several mining booms. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acquired the property in the 1970s as a site of historic interest. The BLM worked to protect the buildings through stabilization and other means. A student from the University of Wyoming American Studies Department was hired to research and write a historic context for the site.

This project was prepared by the University of Wyoming American Studies Department under the supervision of Mary Humstone and Amanda Rees. The goal was to develop an interpretive plan to educate about the Miner’s Delight site and put it into context within Wyoming’s history.

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