Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCash, Kevin J.
dc.contributor.authorJewell, Megan P.
dc.contributor.committeememberSarkar, Susanta K.
dc.contributor.committeememberNeeves, Keith B.
dc.contributor.committeememberSamaniuk, Joseph R.
dc.contributor.committeememberRamey, C. Josh
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-06T10:05:17Z
dc.date.available2020-04-06T10:05:17Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2020 Spring.
dc.description.abstractBacterial biofilms are complex, heterogeneous communities of bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix of polysaccharides, DNA, protein, and other biopolymers. Biofilms are ubiquitous across bacterial species and are believed to be the default mode of growth for many species. Opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa form biofilm infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients and in wounds. Because of reasons such as this, investigating the ways different metabolites are utilized is crucial to our understanding, use, and control of these complex microbial communities. In this work, polymeric oxygen nanosensors are presented as both a research tool for quantifying oxygen dynamics with enhanced resolution as well as a potential clinical tool for evaluating antibiotic efficacy in vitro. These nanosensors can determine 3-dimensional oxygen variation through both space and time and monitor metabolic changes from administration of antibiotics. Potassium-selective nanosensors that utilize the unique photomechanism of triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion are also detailed as a potential solution to overcome issues of signal crosstalk in imaging-based monitoring. These upconversion sensors have a potassium-specific response with a response midpoint of 0.82 mM K+ and no measurable crosstalk with typical downconversion probes (demonstrated with a GFP-producing bacterial biofilm). The development of these nanosensors provides new tools and methods to investigate the biochemical dynamics within bacterial biofilms. The oxygen nanosensors let us monitor 4D dynamics for oxygen whereas prior approaches have been limited in spatial and temporal resolution, and the upconversion sensors allow for monitoring of ion dynamics without interference from traditional fluorescent reporters in these biological systems.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierJewell_mines_0052E_11908.pdf
dc.identifierT 8892
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/174073
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2020 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectbiosensor
dc.subjectmicroscopy
dc.subjectsensor
dc.subjectfluorescence
dc.subjectbiofilm
dc.subjectnanosensor
dc.titleNovel luminescent nanosensors and their applications in quantifying and monitoring analyte gradients in bacterial biofilms
dc.typeText
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical and Biological Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record