Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBunge, Annette L.
dc.contributor.authorPfeiffer, Randolph M.
dc.contributor.committeememberCollins, Reuben T.
dc.contributor.committeememberWay, J. Douglas
dc.contributor.committeememberNavidi, William Cyrus
dc.contributor.committeememberJechura, John
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-16T13:51:51Z
dc.date.available2019-07-16T13:51:51Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2019 Summer.
dc.description.abstractEmulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems are water-in-oil emulsions dispersed in water, which, with appropriate chemistry, can efficiently extract and concentrate metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, copper, cobalt, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, gold and silver), weak acids and bases (e.g., phenolics and amines), inorganic species and pharmaceuticals (e.g., acetaminophen and amino acids) from the external water phase. Since their invention in 1968, ELM systems have been studied extensively. Most studies in the literature have investigated the extraction performance of ELM systems. This dissertation reports experimental investigations of several formulation and operating parameters on leakage and swell of the internal water droplets, which reduce extraction efficiency and concentration of extracted substances. Leakage and swell were measured in both batch and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) systems for the same formulation and operating conditions. The batch and CSTR results are compared to test, for the first time, whether leakage and swell in the CSTR system can be predicted from measurements in the batch system, which is easier to study. Several other researchers have used pH change in the external water phase to quantify leakage of internal droplets containing acid or base. Often the equations they used to calculate leakage contain unstated simplifying assumptions that can produce significant error for some experimental conditions, including those observed in several of these studies. In this dissertation general equations are developed and compared with simplified equations reported in the ELM literature over more than 30 years to identify the underlying assumptions and the magnitude of the potential error. A detailed analysis of one previously reported ELM leakage study based on pH measurements was performed. The original leakage results are corrected, which led to revised conclusions about the effects of formulation and operating conditions on leakage.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierPfeiffer_mines_0052E_11775.pdf
dc.identifierT 8763
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11124/173109
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectleakage
dc.subjectemulsion liquid membrane
dc.subjectswell
dc.titleLeakage and swell in emulsion liquid membranes: experimental studies and corrected computational methods
dc.typeText
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical and Biological Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record