Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKing, Jeffrey C.
dc.contributor.authorAlameri, Saeed A.
dc.contributor.committeememberTurner, Cameron J.
dc.contributor.committeememberOlson, D. L. (David LeRoy)
dc.contributor.committeememberGreife, Uwe
dc.contributor.committeememberGomez, Judith C.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:13:42Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T07:13:42Z
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.description2015 Spring
dc.descriptionIncludes illustrations (some color)
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractNuclear power plants usually provide base-load electric power and operate most economically at a constant power level. In an energy grid with a high fraction of renewable energy sources, future nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling the reactor to a large Thermal Energy Storage (TES) block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this thesis, a Prismatic-core Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PAHTR) operates at constant power with heat provided to a TES block that supplies power as needed to a secondary energy conversion system. The PAHTR is designed to have a power rating of 300 MWth, with 19.75 wt% enriched Tri-Structural-Isotropic UO2 fuel and a five year operating cycle. The passive molten salt TES system will operate in the latent heat region with an energy storage capacity of 150 MWd. Multiple smaller TES blocks are used instead of one large block to enhance the efficiency and maintenance complexity of the system. A transient model of the coupled reactor/TES system is developed to study the behavior of the system in response to varying load demands. The model uses six-delayed group point kinetics and decay heat models coupled to thermal-hydraulic and heat transfer models of the reactor and TES system. Based on the transient results, the preferred TES design consists of 1000 blocks, each containing 11000 LiCl phase change material tubes. A safety assessment of major reactor events demonstrates the inherent safety of the coupled system. The loss of forced circulation study determined the minimum required air convection heat removal rate from the reactor core and the lowest possible reduced primary flow rate that can maintain the reactor in a safe condition. The loss of ultimate heat sink study demonstrated the ability of the TES to absorb the decay heat of the reactor fuel while cooling the PAHTR after an emergency shutdown. The simulated reactivity insertion accident assessment determined the maximum allowable reactivity insertion to the PAHTR as a function of shutdown response times.
dc.identifierT 7751
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11124/17109
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectMolten salt reactor
dc.subjectThermal energy storage
dc.subjectSafety assessment
dc.subject.lcshNuclear power plants
dc.subject.lcshHeat storage
dc.subject.lcshNuclear reactors
dc.subject.lcshEnergy storage
dc.subject.lcshMolten salt reactors
dc.titleCoupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation, A
dc.typeThesis
dc.typeDataset
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record