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dc.contributor.advisorVan Tyne, C. J.
dc.contributor.authorHomsher-Ritosa, Caryn Nicole
dc.contributor.committeememberSpeer, J. G.
dc.contributor.committeememberDe Moor, Emmanuel
dc.contributor.committeememberBourne, Gerald
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Ronald L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-21T19:45:02Z
dc.date.available2016-09-21T19:45:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2016 Fall.
dc.description.abstractMicroalloying elements are added to plate steels to improve the mechanical properties through grain refinement and precipitation strengthening. In industrial practice, such refinement is obtained by controlling the rolling near critical temperatures in austenite. Generally, a large amount of hot deformation is desired below the no-recrystallization temperature (TNR) to increase the grain boundary area to promote fine ferrite grains upon transformation during cooling. Ideally, a high TNR is desired for increased deformation below TNR at minimal rolling loads and minimal loss of productivity. To increase TNR, microalloying elements such as Nb, V, and Ti are used. The primary purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of multiple microalloying elements on the mechanically determined via torsion testing no-recrystallization temperature (TNR_Tor) in Nb-bearing plate steel. This project focused on the influence of alloying elements and deformation parameters on TNR_Tor. The main objective was to experimentally determine the TNR_Tor for various laboratory-grade steels with systematically varying amounts of Nb, V, and Ti, with C and N held constant. The synergistic effects of these microalloying elements were evaluated. Another objective was to determine the TNR_Tor with systematically varied deformation parameters for the same set of steels. Comparisons of the measured TNR through two different mechanical tests were conducted. Finally, a microstructural evaluation around the mechanically determined TNR_Tor via multistep hot torsion testing was made. To accomplish these objectives six Nb-bearing steels were laboratory produced with 0.065 wt pct C, 0.044 wt pct N, and varying amounts of Nb, V, and Ti. Multistep hot torsion tests were conducted using the Gleeble® 3500 thermomechanical simulator between the temperatures of 1200 and 750 °C. The mean flow stress was calculated for each deformation step and plotted against the inverse absolute temperature. The TNR_Tor was determined by finding the intersection point of two linear regressions fit to the data. The TNR_Tor values were compared with measured TNR values from double-hit compression tests and with predicted values using empirical equations from the literature. Light optical micrographs and electron backscatter diffraction scans were examined for samples quenched from just above and just below the experimentally determined values of TNR_Tor for the high Nb, low Ti, and commercially produced 10V45 alloys to help verify the prior austenite grain morphology. For all processing conditions, the low Nb alloy was the least effective in increasing TNR_Tor and the high additions of Ti were the most effective at increasing TNR_Tor. The additions of V were not significantly effective in altering TNR_Tor and it is believed the Nb overpowered any influence the V additions may have had on TNR_Tor. An increase in strain or an increase strain rate decreased TNR_Tor. The TNR values measured from multistep hot torsion testing were lower than the TNR values measured from double-hit compression tests. The use of the mean flow stress versus inverse temperature curve to determine TNR_Tor does not correlate to the microstructural meaning of TNR (i.e. no recrystallization). The transition from completely recrystallized grains to less than complete recrystallization is not properly modeled by the intersection of two linear regions and is more gradual than the mechanical test implies. From the microstructural analysis of a10V45 steel, there is evidence of recrystallization at temperatures 200 °C below the measured TNR_Tor. The slope change on the mean flow stress versus inverse temperature curves is believed to be, in part, accumulated strain as well as refinement of continuously recrystallized grains causing a Hall-Petch type strength increase.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierT 8132
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11124/170429
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2016 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectmicroalloyed steel
dc.subjectrecrystallization
dc.subjectdouble-hit compression
dc.subjecttorsion tests
dc.subjectno-recrystallization temperature
dc.titleInfluence of processing parameters and alloying additions on the mechanically determined no-recrystallization temperature In niobium microalloyed steels
dc.typeText
thesis.degree.disciplineMetallurgical and Materials Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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