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dc.contributor.advisorLange, Ian
dc.contributor.authorKemal, Mohammad
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Elizabeth Van Wie
dc.contributor.committeememberFell, Harrison
dc.contributor.committeememberManiloff, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-19T21:51:54Z
dc.date.available2016-09-19T21:51:54Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2016 Fall.
dc.description.abstractRegulation of the oil and gas sector is consequential to the economies of oil-producing countries. In the literature, there are two types of regulation: indirect regulation through taxes and tariffs or direct regulation through the creation of a National Oil Company (NOC). In the 1970s, many oil-producing countries nationalized their oil and gas sectors by creating and giving ownership rights of oil and gas resources to NOCs. In light of the success of Norway in regulating its oil and gas resources, over the past two decades several countries have changed their oil governance by changing the rights given to NOC from ownership right to mere access rights like other oil companies. However, empirical literature on these changes in oil governance is quite thin. Thus, this dissertation will explore three research questions to investigate empirically these changes in oil governance. First, I investigate empirically the impact of the changes in oil governance on aggregate domestic income. By employing a difference-in-difference method, I will show that a country which changed its oil governance increases its GDP per-capita by 10%. However, the impact is different for different types of political institution. Second, by observing the changes in oil governance in Indonesia , I explore the impact of the changes on learning-by-doing and learning spillover effect in offshore exploration drilling. By employing an econometric model which includes interaction terms between various experience variables and changes in an oil governance dummy, I will show that the change in oil governance in Indonesia enhances learning-by-doing by the rigs and learning spillover in a basin. Lastly, the impact of the changes in oil governance on expropriation risk and extraction path will be explored. By employing a difference-in-difference method, this essay will show that the changes in oil governance reduce expropriation and the impact of it is different for different sizes of resource stock.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifierT 8124
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11124/170420
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado School of Mines. Arthur Lakes Library
dc.relation.ispartof2016 - Mines Theses & Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.titleEmpirical studies on changes in oil governance
dc.typeText
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomics and Business
thesis.degree.grantorColorado School of Mines
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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