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dc.contributor.advisorSamuelson, Kristin W.
dc.contributor.authorEngle, Krista
dc.contributor.committeememberBenight, Charles C.
dc.contributor.committeememberMaxfield, Molly
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-20T20:57:03Z
dc.date.available2019-12-20T20:57:03Z
dc.date.submitted2019-12
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractPsychological flexibility is considered to be a person’s ability to flexibly use emotional, behavioral, and cognitive strategies to adapt to changing situational demands. A lack of psychological flexibility has been associated with the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Complex PTSD (CPTSD) is a relatively new diagnosis characterized by disturbances in self-organization. Emotion regulation deficits have commonly been cited as underlying the development and maintenance of CPTSD symptoms. However, psychological flexibility may better explain the pervasive rigidity seen in individuals with CPTSD. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between emotion regulation and psychological flexibility and determine whether a relationship exists between psychological and cognitive flexibility and CPTSD symptom severity as measured using both self-report and neuropsychological assessments. Data from 93 trauma-exposed adults demonstrated that the factors underlying measures of emotion regulation, psychological flexibility, and cognitive flexibility do not meaningfully overlap with each other. However, flexible use of emotion regulation strategies, a sense of control when under stress, and performance on a neuropsychological task of cognitive flexibility were uniquely predictive of CPTSD symptom severity, whereas emotion regulation was not. These results suggest that the inflexibility underlying CPTSD may be multidimensional and reach beyond simply using emotion regulation strategies. Clinically, developing greater psychological and cognitive flexibility may be a promising target for the treatment of CPTSD. Further research is needed in order to replicate these findings and determine the directionality of the relationships between emotion regulation, psychological and cognitive flexibility, and CPTSD symptoms.
dc.identifierEngle_uccs_0892N_10518.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/167221
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectComplex PTSD
dc.subjectneuropsychological assessment
dc.subjectcognitive flexibility
dc.subjectpsychological flexibility
dc.subjectemotion regulation
dc.titleRoles of Psychological and Cognitive Flexibility in Complex PTSD, The
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


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