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dc.contributor.advisorDawes, J. Jay
dc.contributor.authorStahl, Cody Allen
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-15T21:45:34Z
dc.date.available2019-05-15T21:45:34Z
dc.date.submitted2019-05
dc.identifierStahl_uccs_0892N_10468.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/167102
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThe countermovement jump (CMJ) is a practical, reliable and valid test used to measure lower-body power. The CMJ is frequently utilized by strength and conditioning professionals working with athletes, given its relationship to a multitude of performance variables associated with success in sports. PURPOSE: To examine characteristics of CMJ performance between differing levels of competition. A secondary aim was to report descriptive data on jump performance for NAIA and NCAA Division I male and female athletes. METHODS: Archival data for 275 student athletes from two NCAA division 1 universities (NCAA DI; males = 84, females = 74) and one NAIA university (NAIA; males = 66, females = 51) were utilized for this analysis. The CMJ was performed utilizing a dual single axis (Pasco PS 2141 plates, sampling rate 1000hz unfiltered) force platform system. A 2 x 2 multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine whether significant differences in the three dependent variables of VJ height (cm) calculated by flight time, concentric RPD-100ms, and peak power existed between athletes at different playing levels. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was the used to investigate how the three dependent variables or outcome variables may discriminate the participants based on a combined variable (sex and competition level). RESULTS: The MANOVA showed significant differences based on sex and competition level in the dependent variables (Wilk’s Lambda = 0.908, F(3,259) = 8.732, p < .001, partial2 = .092). Discriminant analysis revealed one significant function (Wilk’s Lambda = .3, 2 (9) = 316.9, p <.001, canonical R2 = .69. The significant function was primarily represented differences based on peak power (W) and jump height. DISCUSSION: The findings of this study revealed that females at the DI level performed significantly better in the CMJ based on jump height, peak power and concentric RPD-100ms compared to females at the NAIA. Division I males displayed significantly higher peak power than their NAIA counterparts.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectNAIA
dc.subjectPower
dc.subjectNCAA
dc.subjectCountermovement Jump
dc.titleCOMPARISON OF LOWER BODY POWER CHARACTERISTICS BETWEEN NAIA AND NCAA DIVISION I COLLEGIATE ATHLETES, A
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.committeememberLindsay, Keston G.
dc.contributor.committeememberMann, J. Bryan
dc.contributor.committeememberHunt, Margaret
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineHelen and Arthur E. Johnson Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Science-Sports Medicine
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs


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