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dc.contributor.advisorVogt, Brandon
dc.contributor.authorSwan, Thaddeus Harrison
dc.contributor.committeememberHuber, Tom
dc.contributor.committeememberHurst, Stance
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-13T21:25:37Z
dc.date.available2019-05-13T21:25:37Z
dc.date.submitted2019-05
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThroughout North America, caches are recognized as an important feature type in prehistoric research. Unlike other site or feature types, the materials associated with these assemblages are not a result of discard, breakage during manufacture, or accidental loss, but represent a rare window into prehistoric toolkits where usable items within various stages of manufacture are stored for future use. In addition, cache locations and the raw material source locations of the feature contents can assist with research questions regarding mobility and settlement/subsistence strategies (among others). However, many caches have been removed from their original context either through disturbance or discovery by non-archaeologists, who unwittingly destroy the context of the find. In other instances, archaeologists discover cache locations that are largely disturbed by erosion or lack the organic or temporal-cultural diagnostic artifact traits necessary for placement in a chronological framework, which greatly restricts the interpretive value of these assemblages. Therefore, when caches are discovered that retain contextual integrity, these resources are highly regarded for their information potential in prehistoric research. First discovered in 2010, the Owens Cache (5LA12616) consists of a tightly clustered group of artifacts identified below a small bedrock ledge and crevice. Remnant portions of the crevice overhang exhibit depositional integrity where intact portions of the cache could feasibly be recovered. The fundamental goals of this thesis research are to perform test excavations of this feature in an attempt to reconstruct the depositional history and landscape features of the cache from a geomorphological perspective and provide a temporal framework for the assemblage. During the course of this investigation, a bisecting trench of the cache feature was established with excavation terminating at bedrock. The results showed that an intact portion of the cache exists underneath one of the more prominent overhangs of the small bedrock shelf with three lithic tools identified within a solid depositional context. Through recovery of datable organics and an interpretation of landform stratigraphy, the feature could be reliably placed within the Protohistoric period and the geomorphic attributes of the landform defined.
dc.identifierSwan_uccs_0892N_10451.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/167097
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.relation.ispartofTheses
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectColorado
dc.subjectProtohistoric
dc.subjectGeomorphology
dc.subjectCache
dc.titleEXAMINATION OF THE OWENS CACHE IN SOUTHEASTERN COLORADO
dc.typeText
dcterms.cdm.subcollectionApplied Geography
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Applied Geography
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


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