Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPyszczynski, Tom
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Jerika Allison
dc.contributor.committeememberBenight, Chip
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniels, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T15:46:50Z
dc.date.available2018-05-17T15:46:50Z
dc.date.submitted2018-05
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThe current study was designed to assess hypotheses derived from the Precarious Manhood Thesis, Anxiety Buffer Disruption Theory, and Terror Management Theory. Specifically, this study attempted to assess whether men who do versus do not have PTSD differ in the degree to which they find hyper-masculine (muscular) images presented to them as threatening. Participants (n = 207) completed measures assessing PTSD symptomology and pre-existing levels of conformity to masculine norms. Next, they were randomly assigned to either a realistic hyper-masculine threat condition, supernatural hyper-masculine threat condition, or a control, non-threat condition. Post manipulation, participants completed assessments that evaluated their reported negative affect, positive affect, death- and suicide-thought accessibility, and defensive behaviors. Two-way between-groups analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) were conducted to explore the impact of PTSD status and exposure to hyper-masculine primes on several dependent variables after controlling for conformity to masculine norms (operationally defined as scores on the CMNI). Among participants who had PTSD, as compared to participants who did not, exposure to hyper-masculine images appeared to produce more negative affect. In addition, this study suggested that depictions of hyper-muscular men can be used to threaten the more abstract construct of masculinity: Exposure to supernatural but not realistic hyper-muscular images, regardless of participants’ PTSD status, tended to elicit more negative attitudes toward women.
dc.identifierTaylor_uccs_0892N_10377.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/166946
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectMasculine identity
dc.subjectPTSD
dc.subjectTerror Management Theory
dc.subjectPrecarious Manhood Thesis
dc.subjectAnxiety Buffer Disruption Theory
dc.subjectSuperheroes
dc.titlePOSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AS A THREAT TO MASCULINE IDENTITY
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record