Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDurham, Robert
dc.contributor.authorColon, Lisa Michelle
dc.contributor.committeememberFeliciano, Leilani
dc.contributor.committeememberSamuelson, Kristen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T17:40:00Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T17:40:00Z
dc.date.submitted2017-08
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractHuman sexuality is a lifelong, developmental process that is affected by both biological functioning and experiential inputs (Wurtele & Kenny, 2011). Research into sexuality typically begins with adolescents leaving gaps in our understanding of childhood sexuality and the experiences during that developmental stage that may be predictive of adult sexual interests and attitudes. The current study created an inventory that measures numerous childhood experiences: sexual, familial, and educational factors that may work together to explain the formation of human sexuality. The inventory assesses childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and determines an effective prevalence, which is based on subjective and objective measures of lasting effects from CSA experiences. One underlying focus of the inventory measures CSA and sexual interest in children to better understand the experiences that may serve as risk factors for CSA perpetration. A secondary focus is to gather information regarding changes in sexual interests across the lifespan and then evaluate any childhood experiences that may have contributed positively or negatively. The inventory was designed to further research into human sexuality as a function of childhood experiences. There were 652 participants from five different sources who responded to the inventory online at a location of their choosing. All previously validated scales were analyzed for replication of internal consistency from previous analyses. New measures were subjected to exploratory factor analysis, reliability, and validation analyses. All new scales evaluated were uni-dimensional thereby eliminating the need for confirmatory or other further analyses. All scales except the Perpetration subscale that lacked sufficient affirmative responses were successfully validated with convergent and divergent validating scales. This measure has implications for parents, teachers, and other adults who interact with children voluntarily or professionally. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
dc.identifierColon_uccs_0892N_10300.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10976/166716
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectCSA
dc.subjectSexuality
dc.subjectPerpetration
dc.subjectChild Sexual Abuse
dc.titleCREATING THE LIFETIME SEXUALITY SCALE (LSI): IMPLICATIONS FOR CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record