Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKisley, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorPoe, Jennifer Marie
dc.contributor.committeememberGreene, Edie L.
dc.contributor.committeememberGavett, Brandon E.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-10T22:43:10Z
dc.date.available2016-11-10T04:39:28Z
dc.date.submitted2016-05
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractAttachment theory is often used to explain differences in responses to emotional events and perceived threats from the environment related to interpersonal relationships. While this has been thoroughly studied regarding interpersonal attachment, potential attachment to God has only begun to be explored. The present study aimed to assess neurophysiological measures of attachment, in particular electroencephalograms (EEGs) to attachment cues, as these could provide insight into the early, automatic processes of attention allocation when the threat of separation from God (the attachment figure) is made salient through negative cues. For the present study, moderate to highly religious individuals heard attachment-related sentence stems in which God was centered as the attachment figure. These stems ended with the visual presentation of a positive, negative, or nonword target. Brain responses to these target words were analyzed across three epochs (N400, early LPP, and late LPP). Results regarding attachment style predicting N400 amplitudes for negative cues trended toward significance with attachment anxiety predicting smaller (less negative) N400s, contrary to hypotheses. However, exploratory analyses revealed an interaction of word type by time epoch such that negative words garnered greater sustained attention in the late LPP. Furthermore, attachment anxiety was a significant predictor of this later attention allocation to negative cues when participants reported being in a relationship. Interpretations of these findings are explored in the framework of the correspondence and compensation models of religious attachment. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
dc.identifierPoe_uccs_0892N_10170.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10976/166574
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs. Kraemer Family Library
dc.relation.ispartofTheses
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.rights.accessEmbargo Expires: 11/10/2016
dc.subjectAttachment Theory
dc.subjectEEG
dc.subjectERP
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectReligious Attachment
dc.titleCloser to God: An ERP Investigation into the Role of God as an Attachment Figure
dc.typeText
dcterms.cdm.subcollectionPsychology
dcterms.embargo.expires2016-11-10
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Letters, Arts, and Sciences-Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado Colorado Springs
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (M.A.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record