Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHokanson, John E.
dc.contributor.authorBlack-Shinn, Jennifer Louise
dc.contributor.committeememberSontag, Marci
dc.contributor.committeememberBowler, Russell
dc.contributor.committeememberAloia, Mark
dc.contributor.committeememberLutz, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:32:18Z
dc.date.available2016-05-31T08:20:26Z
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.descriptionSpring
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or Overlap syndrome has been shown to occur anywhere between 1-40% in population and clinic studies. Subjects with overlap syndrome are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality than subjects with either condition alone. It has been hypothesized that hypoxic induced inflammation occurs in both conditions however research is limited as to the relationship between OSA and subclinical cardiovascular disease and the affect COPD has on this relationship. Several studies have looked at the association between OSA and COPD with conflicting results. A limitation to this research is defining COPD strictly by pulmonary function. Additionally there is inadequate research evaluating the relationship between OSA and subclinical atherosclerosis specifically examining the influence of various pulmonary abnormalities. The overall goal of the proposed research is to explore the pathway between OSA and subclinical atherosclerosis with measures of calcification from coronary and thoracic arteries and determine if these relationships are altered by pulmonary abnormalities. In addition, we evaluated the validity of self-reported OSA and the utility of Berlin sleep questionnaire in a COPD population. Multivariable regression analyses were utilized to evaluate these relationships. OSA was found to not be related to pulmonary function reduction (GOLD stages 2-4) or Emphysema however, there was a significant relationship with chronic bronchitis. In evaluating the association of OSA with calcification measures, we found a significant upward trend of prevalent OSA by increased severity of CAC (p<0.05) and there was an independent relationship between OSA and CAC independent of functional reduction and emphysema in adjusted models. Examining the differences in re-saturation time we found that subjects with OSA and Emphysema had significantly greater re-saturation time than subjects with OSA alone. When evaluating all relationships using self-reported OSA, the results were ameliorated. It was also determined that the Berlin sleep questionnaire does not accurately identify OSA in a COPD population. These are the first studies to fully examine the relationships between OSA and pulmonary abnormalities and further evaluate the influence these abnormalities have on subclinical atherosclerosis.
dc.identifierBlackShinn_ucdenveramc_1639D_10095.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10968/501
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Strauss Health Sciences Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.rights.access2-year embargo
dc.rights.accessAccess restricted until May 31, 2016.
dc.subjectBerlin sleep questionnaire
dc.subjectMisclassification
dc.subject.meshEpidemiology
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases
dc.subject.meshMorbidity
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
dc.titleExamining the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea, pulmonary abnormalities, and cardiovascular disease
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.embargo.expires2016-05-31
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado at Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record