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dc.contributor.advisorChristiansen, Cory L.
dc.contributor.advisorSchenkman, Margaret L.
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.committeememberCook, Paul F.
dc.contributor.committeememberMagnusson, Dawn M.
dc.contributor.committeememberMorris, Megan A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-14T15:44:28Z
dc.date.available2022-01-06T15:44:31Z
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.descriptionFall
dc.description.abstractPeople with dysvascular and traumatic etiology of lower-limb amputation (LLA) in middle age or later report severe disability with conventional rehabilitation approaches that primarily target the use of a prosthesis. Although psychosocial factors (e.g., self-efficacy, social support, resilience) are recognized as influential features of rehabilitation outcomes, they are not specifically addressed within conventional rehabilitation approaches. The purpose of this dissertation was to identify psychosocial mechanisms of physical activity and participation that could be targeted with novel interventions after dysvascular and traumatic LLA in middle age or later, an understudied area of rehabilitation. A convergent mixed-methods approach was used, where quantitative data and qualitative semi-structured interviews were collected and analyzed. A total of 126 participants with dysvascular (n = 102) and traumatic LLA (n= 24) were enrolled. Significant relationships of self-efficacy and social support with disability were determined using a general linear regression with backward elimination. Resilience characteristics meaningful to people with LLA were also qualitatively identified and included coping skills, cognitive flexibility, optimism, skill for facing fear, and social support. Mixed-methods analyses were undertaken to interpret and describe psychosocial mechanisms of physical activity after dysvascular LLA. This dissertation contributes to growing evidence for the influence of psychosocial factors on rehabilitation outcomes after dysvascular and traumatic LLA, especially those in middle age or later. Findings from this dissertation provide a foundation for the development and testing of novel interventions targeting psychosocial factors that influence rehabilitation outcomes after LLA.
dc.identifierMiller_ucdenveramc_1639D_10682.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10968/4767
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of Colorado at Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus. Health Sciences Library
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.rights.accessEmbargo Expires: 01/06/2022
dc.subjectPsychosocial
dc.subject.meshDisabled Persons
dc.subject.meshSocial Support
dc.subject.meshExercise
dc.subject.meshAmputation
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacy
dc.titleIdentifying targets for improved activity and participation after dysvascular and traumatic amputation in middle age or older
dc.typeText
dcterms.embargo.expires2022-01-06
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitation Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Colorado at Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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