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dc.contributor.authorStapp, Paul
dc.contributor.institutionColorado State University
dc.coverage.temporal1997-2006
dc.date1997-2006
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:21:33Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:21:33Z
dc.descriptionThe Short Grass Steppe site encompasses a large portion of the Colorado Piedmont Section of the western Great Plains. The extent is defined as the boundaries of the Central Plains Experimental Range (CPER). The CPER has a single ownership and landuse (livestock grazing). The PNG is characterized by a mosaic of ownership and land use. Ownership includes federal, state or private and land use consists of livestock grazing or row-crops. There are NGO conservation groups that exert influence over the area, particularly on federal lands.
dc.description.abstractThis data package was produced by researchers working on the Shortgrass Steppe Long Term Ecological Research (SGS-LTER) Project, administered at Colorado State University. Long-term datasets and background information (proposals, reports, photographs, etc.) on the SGS-LTER project are contained in a comprehensive project collection within the Repository (http://hdl.handle.net/10217/100254). The data table and associated metadata document, which is generated in Ecological Metadata Language, may be available through other repositories serving the ecological research community and represent components of the larger SGS-LTER project collection. Carnivores are among the most conspicuous, charismatic and economically important mammals in shortgrass steppe, yet relatively is little is known about their populations or of the ecological factors that determine their distribution and abundance, in part because densities tend to be low. Mammalian carnivores represent the top predators in grassland food webs, consuming rodents, rabbits, young ungulates and other small vertebrates. In addition, shortgrass steppe is the primary habitat of the swift fox (Vulpes velox), a species of special conservation concern throughout most of its range. Fox populations are thought to be limited by predation from coyotes (Canis latrans), the most common carnivore in these grasslands and a species of interest, both for its ecological roles and well as a target species for human exploitation, ie hunting and predator control. In 1994, we implemented a low-intensity sampling scheme to monitor long-term changes in relative abundance of mammalian carnivores and help us examine interactions between these predators and their small mammal prey, including rodents and rabbits. We estimated relative abundance of carnivores using scat surveys along a fixed route. Four times each year (January, April, July, October), we drove a 32-km route consisting of pasture two-track and gravel roads on the CPER. We first drove the route to remove all scats ('PRE-census'); we then returned ~14 d later and counted the number of scats deposited on the route ('CENSUS'). We recorded the species that deposited the scat and estimated the scat age based on external appearance (4 categories). Beginning in 1997, we recorded the vegetation (habitat) type and topographic position of all scat locations to describe habitat use. Latrines are indicated by locations containing multiple scats. We used the 'CENSUS' data to calculate a scat index, defined as the number of scats deposited per km of road per night. The scat index can be used to estimate population density using equations for coyotes (Knowlton 1982) and swift foxes (Schauster et al. 2002) that described the rate of scat deposition from surveys where density was known. To estimate density and compare trends among seasons and years, we omitted scats collected along the 8.3 km of the route that occurred on gravel county roads. These roads are graded sporadically, sometimes between pre-census and census surveys, which tended to remove scats. (NOTE: these observations are NOT omitted in the dataset).
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF Grant Number DEB-1027319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/83392
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25675/10217/83392
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.haspartStapp, Paul (2013): SGS-LTER Long-term Monitoring Project: Carnivore Scat Count on the Central Plains Experimental Range, Nunn, Colorado, USA 1997 -2006, , ARS Study Number 98. Long Term Ecological Research Network. http://dx.doi.org/10.6073/pasta/a059a8aa881a4e8a2ab5f13e0918e4a0
dc.relation.ispartofData - Colorado State University
dc.relation.isreferencedbyStapp, Paul T., Determinants of habitat use and community structure of rodents in northern shortgrass steppe. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Colorado State University, 1996. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82331
dc.relation.isreferencedbyLauenroth, W. K., and I. C. Burke, Ecology of the Shortgrass Steppe : A Long-Term Perspective (Long-Term Ecological Research Network). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2008.
dc.relation.referencesSpecies list of mammals. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/80454
dc.relation.referencesKaplan, Nicole, SGS-LTER GIS layer with detailed information on study sites on Central Plains Experimental Range, Nunn, Colorado, USA 2012 (dataset). http://hdl.handle.net/10217/87177
dc.rightsData sets were provided by the Shortgrass Steppe Long Term Ecological Research (SGS-LTER) Program, a partnership between Colorado State University, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, and the U.S. Forest Service Pawnee National Grassland. Significant funding for these data was provided by the National Science Foundation Long Term Ecological Research program (NSF Grant Number DEB-1027319). The SGS-LTER project (1980-2014) was established as one of the first sites in the US LTER Network and has produce a rich legacy of digital materials including reports, proposals, images, and data packages. Data, products and other information produced from the SGS-LTER are curated as a collection within the Repository (http://hdl.handle.net/10217/100254). Materials can be accessed from the Institutional Digital Repository of Colorado State University or upon request by emailing ecodata_nrel@colostate.edu. All data are open for dissemination and re-use for any purpose, but you must attribute credit to the owner and cite use appropriately according to the LTER Data Access Policy (http://www.lternet.edu/policies/data-access).
dc.subjectpopulations
dc.subjectpopulation dynamics
dc.subjectmammals
dc.subjectswift fox
dc.subjectcommunity dynamics
dc.subjectcoyote
dc.titleSGS-LTER Long-term Monitoring Project: Carnivore Scat Count on the Central Plains Experimental Range, Nunn, Colorado, USA 1997 -2006, ARS Study Number 98
dc.typeDataset


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