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dc.contributor.authorGrandin, Temple
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T07:50:28Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T07:50:28Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.citationGrandin, Temple, Restraint of Livestock. Animal Behavior and the Design of Livestock and Poultry Systems: proceedings from the Animal Behavior and the Design of Livestock and Poultry Systems International Conference. Ithaca, NY: Northeast Regional Agricultural Engineering Service, Cooperative Extension, 1995.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/4158
dc.descriptionPresented at the Animal Behavior and the Design of Livestock and Poultry Systems International Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana, April 19-21, 1995.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 10-13)
dc.description.abstractDuring twenty years of work on livestock handling and design of restraining devices for animals I have observed that many people attempt to restrain animals with sheer force instead of using behavioral principles. Improvements in the design of restraining devices enhances animal welfare and will reduce stress and injuries. A series of surveys conducted by the author showed that changing the design of a squeeze chute would reduce injuries to cattle (Grandin 1975), but there is still a great need to improve squeeze chutes that are used on larger feedlots and ranches. Under the best conditions, cattle can become bruised or injured in a conventional squeeze chute. A survey of seven major feedlots by Brown et al.,(1981) indicated that in five of the feedlots 1.6% to 7.8% of the animals were bruised. Even though bruises would heal by marketing time, pain and trauma may reduce weight gain. Cattle can become asphyxiated by excessive pressure on the carotid arteries. In a standard hydraulic stanchion squeeze chute used in most commercial feedyards an inexperienced operator can cause 2% of the cattle to collapse from pressure on the carotid arteries (Grandin 1980). A collapsed animal will die if the operator fails to release it immediately. Excessive hydraulic pressure can cause severe injuries. The animal's diaphragm can be ruptured (Fulton, R. 1973 personal communication). Excessive pressure can break the pelvis (Miles, D. 1992 personal communication). The author has also observed that excessive squeeze pressure can cause a significant reduction in weight gain. Good management can prevent many of these problems but there is still a great need for improved restraint devices for use on ranches and feedlots. I did not realize how poor existing chutes in feedlots were until I developed restraint devices for calf and beef slaughter plants.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.subjectbehavioral principles
dc.subjectanimal welfare
dc.subjectrestraining devices
dc.subjectlivestock handling
dc.titleRestraint of livestock
dc.typeArticle


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