Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBanning, James H.
dc.contributor.advisorBigner, Jerry J.
dc.contributor.authorMaier, Shelby Marie
dc.contributor.committeememberDickmann, Ellyn M.
dc.contributor.committeememberGriffin, Cindy L.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T05:45:10Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T05:45:10Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.descriptionDepartment Head: Dale E. DeVoe.
dc.description2010 Summer.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractAs it has been shown repeatedly in the research literature, school climate influences student academic achievement, typically employing a single methodology to collect data: a quantitative organizational climate survey administered to school stakeholders. Utilizing a sequential transformative mixed methods design, I studied how the results of the two methodologies were different and similar. The school climate factors of parental involvement, school safety, and building facilities were studied within 14 K-12 schools. Equity factors were also integrated into the study. Given that these school climate factors are interdependent, the factors needed to be studied using multiple methods. The 'sequential' portion of the research design accomplished this, which first entailed a quantitative organizational climate survey and then a visual ethnography was conducted. The results from the two methodologies uncovered more similarities than differences between higher-ranked and lower-ranked school climates. The `transformative' portion involved critiquing the results from a feminist lens, which produced recommendations for school climate improvement. This study demonstrated that school climate provides a level of complexity that is difficult to assess. Future studies need to utilize innovative designs and progressive methodologies to ensure any modifications made to the school climate are carried out with intentionality and mindfulness. Last but definitely not least, feminist ideals should be at the forefront throughout the school climate and school improvement processes.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifier2010_Summer_Maier_Shelby.pdf
dc.identifierMaier_colostate_0053A_10038.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2010100004EDUC
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/39109
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectwelcoming
dc.subjectvisual enthography
dc.subjectschool climate
dc.subjectphotographs
dc.subjectorganizational climate
dc.subjectdiversity
dc.subject.lcshClassroom environment
dc.subject.lcshSchool environment
dc.subject.lcshSchool management and organization
dc.subject.lcshSchool improvement programs
dc.subject.lcshEducation -- Research -- Methodology
dc.subject.lcshInclusive education
dc.titleAssessing school climate using a sequential transformative design
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record